From Rock clubs to Musical Collaborations to Poetry: A chat with Cary Goldberg

October 22, 2023 01:12:53
From Rock clubs to Musical Collaborations to Poetry: A chat with Cary Goldberg
Disability Empowerment Now
From Rock clubs to Musical Collaborations to Poetry: A chat with Cary Goldberg

Oct 22 2023 | 01:12:53

/

Show Notes

Cary Goldberg began his 20+ year career as a performing artist on a one night whim. At the age of 14, he wrote a stand up comedy act and opened for a comedy troupe at the local rock club, what was supposed to be one night, ended up spanning 6 years.  Cary always stuck to rock clubs rather than comedy clubs, because as a comedy promoter once eloquently told him “People come to comedy clubs to drink, not to think.” Cary has always believed that if his art wasn’t making people think, he was doing a disservice.  He played hundreds of shows […]
View Full Transcript

Episode Transcript

Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Welcome to Disability Empowerment Now, season three. I'm your host Keith Murfee-DeConcini. Today I'm talking to my very good friend Cary Goldberg, who is a spoken audit musician in New York City, who's working with several startup companies. Cary, welcome to the show. Cary Goldberg: Thanks for having me Keith. It's been a long time since we've caught up and I look forward to getting into it. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yeah, so I was just thinking about how we met. We were in an electronic, no, sorry. We were in a classical music class together at American University and the teacher introduced us to each other in front of the entire class, assuming we both have cerebral palsy and assuming that all people with cerebral palsy had the same relationship to our disability and so that was very, very awkward, but it began a 17 plus year friendship. You are one of my dearest friends and I've performed with you in the past. How, first of all, is my memory serving me directly in how you remember how we met? Cary Goldberg: I remember that it was in Sapkowski's music theory class. I don't remember exactly the terms, but I do think that he introduced us together at some point. And then that was a wild cast of characters, a lot of which I've kept in touch with all these years. Chris Moreno, Ethan Smith. So yeah, I've kept in touch with a lot of those folks and yeah, I think that's how we met and then I met your family and when you've been in New York, we've caught up. So, yeah, you know, a good friend for la long time. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yeah, it's incredible that you remember the teacher's name and you're right, it was a music theory class. I remember that I did a classical album for that class because that's the first and only time I've used the Music Notation Program finale that dictates classicall compositions, and the teacher found out that I had cerebral palsy. I must have said it to him, and he immediately pointed to you and said, oh, he had cerebral palsy too, which was one of the most bizarre ways to introduce and to meet one of your very good friends that way. I'm glad you've kept in touch with a lot of those people. I've kept in touch with none of them besides you, of course. I think you were a full-time student there at the time, and I needed to fulfill a gap year and a musical itch. So how did you get involved with spoken word? Cary Goldberg: So I started out as a stand up comic, doing punk and hardcore shows when I was young, when I was 15, and it was supposed to be a one night deal. And I've been now, this is my 20 year anniversary as an artist. Sorry I'm a little hoarse today, but yeah, I started in 2003 and it's now 2023, but what happened was, I was doing standup and then I realized quite quickly, I mean, after a number of years. Actually, this is interesting for the podcast, for your listeners. I was watching a rerun of South Park late at night, and I saw the character Timmy, and I never really watched the show. And I realized that people were equating me as somebody with CP to Timmy. And that led to my shifting of what I was doing. I did music for a very short period of time with a friend of mine from American, actually. And we produced a record in my dorm room. And then I was giving that record to people to try to get some years on it. And one of the people I gave it to was a paraplegic musician named Vic Chesnutt. So, we became good friends and every time he was on the road, I'd come see him and say hello, and we had a very complicated friendship because he was suffering from chronic pain, as we all do on some level, but he was really suffering, and he ended up taking his life in 2009. And one day I said, I'm just going to book a gig and I'm just going to talk, just going to talk, talk about my friend, talk about my life. I'm going to talk about where I'm at. And that led to the last 12 years of doing spoken word. I mean, the pandemic changed a lot, but, prior to that, you know, I was pretty active and I'm retiring this year to begin the family planning stage with my wife and focus on that and, you know, 20 years as an artist is a long time, so I think I've given enough. And, I think one of the most cherished aspects of my career has been playing with musicians and opening for bands that end up going a lot further. Playing festivals, becoming rock stars, et cetera. And that is something that I really cherished living vicariously through that and helping them through that at times. And so that, I would, my goal is to kind of work behind the scenes moving forward to try to get artists to be recognized and to get, you know, on the right labels, the right pathways to get them to be successful because, you know, when you've been a part of that journey, I was lucky enough, you know, when I started out the local band, with My Chemical Romance and, you know, when you are around that and you see that ascension when you're, I mean, even in a very small scale, if you're part of that journey, it's really something. So, you know, coming up in that Jersey scene and then later getting into the jazz world and rock world and kind of being a part of multiple rides on some level, has been really rewarding. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: So I saw one of your posts on social media that you have actually run into a singer of a rock band that I've been listening to for years besides My Chemical Romance. Art Alexakis, the lead singer of Everclear. Is that correct? Cary Goldberg: Yeah, yeah. I mean, I don't know him on a personal level. We met after a gig one night, and I actually wrote a piece about him because it was a very interesting kind of interaction but yeah. So Much For the After Glow was the first record I bought as a kid, that was on a cassette tape. And I wore that cassette tape out and, so that band, on some level, will always have, always have a space for me. They also played American when I was there. I don't know if you were there for that, but they played, I got to tell Art, you know, this is my first record. So it was nice. He’s a complicated guy, but he's a good guy. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yeah. So congratulations on just getting married. You mentioned that you are retiring. How was it coming to that decision of retiring after being a musician in several aspects, several different ways for 20 years. Cary Goldberg: Yeah, you know. I wouldn't call myself a musician, more a performing artist. I've dabbled in music, but mostly I leave the music to the professionals and I stay in my lane. But, you know, we came to the decision mutually because, you know, I don't think there's anything more important in life than raising a family. And, I can't be going out doing one nighters and, you know, in St. Louis or wherever and leave my kids at home with my wife, you know. And we talked about, like, even if everything happened for me and I was making, you know, a living as an artist, would it work? And my wife said, I don't want to be a single parent on any level. So I said, okay, give me one more show and I'm going to do that this year. And then we're going to hopefully knock on wood, have some kids and, you know, live the family life as it were. I think you're muted. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sorry about that. Cary Goldberg: No problem. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: How did you meet your wife? Of course I know, I've heard that story. It's very interesting and fun, so would you mind telling it? Cary Goldberg: Yeah, so we met on an app called Coffee Meets Bagel. Which basically the premise is that you have at least one mutual connection on social media. And her icebreaker question was, she's seen Bruce Springsteen 18 times or something like that. And I was like, all right, I don't really love Bruce, but I'm from Jersey and like, I can get down with that. So we spoke for two months before meeting because of her schedule. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Wait, did I hear that correctly? You just said that you spoke for two months before actually meeting. Cary Goldberg: Yeah, yeah. She was working the night shift as an RN at that time. And she was just very busy and work never lended itself to dating, really, but we spoke on the phone for eight hours a day. I mean, you know, so once she came to my door, I knew a lot about her. Put it that way. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: I would hope so if you were speaking day in and day out or somewhat. Cary Goldberg: Yeah, and it worked out because of that time in my life. I was hanging out in the jazz world and staying up late. She was working night shifts, so I'd be able to text her and make sure she was okay and kind of be there for her. And she would drive into the city, come to me, and then we'd sleep and wake up. You know, in the middle of the day and do it all over again. But we've been together seven years and we just celebrated our first wedding anniversary and you know, there's nobody I'd rather be in a foxhole with than my wife. She's incredible. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: That's very true and admirable. So, you're retiring for the most part. One of, if not the most noble reason a man can retire from, the spoken word life. Over your 20 year career, how many albums would you say you've put out? Cary Goldberg: Well, I did two comedy records, which nobody will find and then I did one music record that nobody will find. And then six spoken word records, something like that. Which you can find all on social media, or not social media, streaming media, Spotify, Apple Music. So that is the route, but I mean, all told, maybe 12 records and various media. I know you're pretty prolific. You've done, I think you've done more than 12. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Moonlight Tranquility as an electronic album under the name Ole Tips. And I've been doing that for almost 20 years. I've been active since 2005 and I've easily put over 40 records or EPs, and I'm holding a lot of stuff back because I can't really keep up with my own music and my day job. But yeah, and I don't really talk about that I've also put out a few solo records, a few band records, and as I mentioned at the top how we met, in a classical composition album at American, and so, it's been an interesting journey for me, musically. If we had met earlier and you had made the prophecy or whatever that I would be in electronica, even for a few albums, much less almost 20 years later, I would have laughed and said, who are you? I think you've got the wrong guy here, because that's just not something I ever envisioned. I mean, that's not really my music style. That's not what I grew up listening to, except when I remembered that I grew up listening to the video game soundtracks of Sonic the Hedgehog, and so I've really, without my conscience knowledge being bathing in electronic music and I got into Starstack, Lindsey Stirling is an electric violinist who I deeplpy respect. So I've dabbled in listening wise a lot sooner, and also a lot later consciously than I've been making music. But, yeah, so it's interesting the turns and twists that life will throw at you creatively. Cary Goldberg: On the topic of video game music, I know a few jazz musicians that are really passionate about video game music and they've made jazz compositions of Sonic and Mario and Kirby and all those games and they were actually, there was an orchestra that was nominated for a Grammy this year. I think they're called the 8 Bit Orchestra and a lot of my friends were in that band and I just want to give a special shout out to a great saxophone player who actually moved to Japan to focus more on the video game music arena. His name is Patrick Bartley. He's one of my good buds. And if you ever see him on a gig or see, you know, you have folks in Japan that, you know, want to go to a jazz club. If you ever see Patrick Slim on a Marquee, get ready because he is a beast. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yeah, video game music, video games in general and computer games are also in that category. Over the last 10 plus years, they've expanded extremely in the level of storytelling and the level of visuals, certainly, but also the music is incredible how I can turn on and listen to a soundtrack. And it didn't matter if I played the game or know the game in question, the music is just incredible and they don't need to have any words, although a lot of them do vocals. But yeah, video games and computer games are very much their own art form and they just keep getting better, better, and better. So anyone who tries to attribute them as mindless entertainment is really missing out and really doesn't know what they're talking about. And we've seen that expand in the last decade or so. And so moving away from that, as I mentioned, how we met, at the top of the interview, you also have cerebral palsy. And you've also been a spoken word artist, a performer, I've seen you at a few shows. How has your disability related or impacted your art, your performance style, and the work? Cary Goldberg: On some level, it has impacted it in every way and on some level, it has impacted it in no way. Of course my work tends to be quite personal but I never wrote about my disability beause I thought it was a crutch. It's an easy, easy thing to write about. And then, long before my wife, I was dating a woman and it was New Year's Day and her parents called and she put them on speaker. And they said, and I had met them a week before or something like that. And they said, don't date that guy, he's handicapped Jewish, and I'll probably hurt you if you date him or something like that. And, yeah, that was the end of that. But that inspired me to write a little bit about my disability. So, you know, I have a few pieces that relate to that community and there's some great, great poets, Liv Mammone is a great poet with cerebral palsy. And, you know, I really want to pass the torch to the next generation of great writers on some level. But, yeah, I mean, I'm right about my disability, but more so about my life, and on some level, as you know, with CP, everything is affected by CP. And on some level, it's we're all just living in the world together as humans. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yeah, you mentioned Liv Mammone, she is a very young poet, but she's wiser beyond her years, particularly in her writing style. And so, thank you for mentioning her. So, going back to the start of your career, you first started, if I remember correctly, as a comedian. You brought out some comedy albums that you'd say no one will find, I'm sure you have your reasons for that. How was it transitioning from being a comic to a spoken word artist and a performer? Cary Goldberg: I remember. Now that you have jogged my memory, you were at one of my recordings that we did at American. There's a record called Anytime They Will Speak of This. I think on some level, sorry, as a comedian, I always wanted to further the conversation about who I was, who I am, and really impact people on a deeper level than just, you know, getting a laugh. And it didn't work as the comedian because, you know, I would play comedy clubs and people would say people came to drink not to think, you know, promoters. So that's why I gravitate more towards concerts and opening for bands because at shows, people are there to think. People are there to have their minds changed. They are there for social causes and to connect with other people. You know, if you're in a mosh pit, for example, you're connecting on a physical level, on a visceral level, to the music. But like, if you listen to my set, a lot of times I make people cry because my stuff resonates with them on a deep level and that, to me, is what my job is, right, to make my work palatable enough and strong enough that it resonates and, you know, so I think, ultimately, it was a natural progression and, you know, I have a print of my friend, Vic, and over there on that wall, and I look at it every day, and, you know, I thank him, because none of this would have happened without him. And I've had some wild experiences that I think are in part because of him and 'm just really grateful for it, my career, although I did not achieve the kind of commercial success that one wants. I've had some incredible interactions. I've been able to experience a lot of different things. And, you know, I'm an old man now, but I'm really grateful for the time that I had. You know, I think, you know, I think we gotta, we gotta talk about it, man. The pandemic in New York, it was, um, crazy experience. I had just announced a follow up to my jazz record with 21 musicians all over the world. It's a jazz record called A Prayer for Rhythm. And I had announced that A Prayer for Reckoning was going to come out that fall and a week later, COVID shut down my city and shut down the world and changed my whole worldview. And you know, I spent 18 months inside and you know, getting back to life is a little bit more difficult. You know, so, and the reckoning that I'm hoping for was more of a political reckoning, which, oddly enough, I think, sorry about that. My dog wanted to be part of the podcast for a moment. Yeah, I was really hoping for a political reckoning and, looks like as of yesterday, we might be getting that reckoning finally. But I think COVID on a lot of levels was a reckoning, a different kind of reckoning than I was anticipating that anybody was anticipating, but, you know, being in the epicenter of that. I think my wife and I would probably be married anyway, but we decided to get married. And the pandemic had a lot to do with that because we were living in a studio apartment, and I was inside, and she was doing the grocery shopping, and getting the mail, and, you know, keeping me safe, and walking the dog, and all that, you know. I would have absolutely died if I had stayed in the office I was working in, a week after the shutdown, the guy behind me was on a ventilator, and he almost died. The guy who was two rows down from me, his father passed away and the coworker that sat across from me, she got COVID pretty badly in the first wave. So, I was very, very lucky, and I mean, right before COVID, I was playing the world series of poker in Atlantic City, and there were a number of Asian players that were wearing masks and gloves, and I thought well, what a brilliant strategy play that is. It scared people, you know, but it wasn't a strategy play at all. But like, you know, as a poker player, you're not expecting everything to be on the up and up so much. But you know, I didn't catch it until last July. And at that time I was triple vaccinated and I still got very sick. But man, I am really grateful to have made it through, and, you know, it's a part of our history, and it's a part of our collective trauma that I think we're going to be living with for a long time, and I think people have to talk about it on some level, you know, and we don't want to we want to act like it's not here anymore. We want to act like it disappeared, we want to act like, you know, it never happened, but like, if you were living here, in New York City, and they had makeshift morgues on the street, and, you know, you were waiting every morning for the Cuomo press conference, so he could tell you, you know, how many people died the day before. It is something that I'll never forget, something that bonded my wife and I to a level that I've never been bonded to anybody before, on that level, and, you know, for the people who were here, it was really something, and I was worried about you, because you, I remember it, COVID broke out. You went from New York to Arizona with your family and then COVID followed you to Arizona. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yeah, yeah. I had to make a very ungrateful exit from New York right after I got over COVID the first time, and then I got it again last year, although we knew last year what it was. The first time, no one knew what it was outside of the medical community. But yeah, it was very jarring. The pandemic actually put New York to sleep, quote unquote, for the first time in forever. New York City is famously known as the city that never sleeps, but the pandemic, at its height, knocked it out. So the city did actually sleep. Cary Goldberg: I don't know. If I'd agree with that, I think it was eerie, and different, and strange, but there was a beauty to it, if you could find it. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Do tell me more about that beauty. Cary Goldberg: If you could find the courage to leave the house. We were lucky enough to have a car, and lucky enough that we got a disabled parking pass so we can park all over the city and we would go on car rides to just to pick up food, you know, from uptown, downtown, like all the way down the FDR Drive and, I mean, you've been on the FDR Drive, it doesn't take 10 minutes to go uptown to downtown and it was taken seven minutes to drive through the city. There was nobody. There was nothing. Everything was, the city became the suburbs, for a little while. And, you know, I think, you know, the every night, seven o'clock ritual of you know, thanking healthcare workers by clapping hands and clanging pots together and all that. I mean, it was a really wonderful thing. And, you know, and then eventually people came back and, you know, everybody came back from the Hamptons or wherever they were. And now New York is back to normal on some level, but I tend to wear a mask still because when I was wearing a mask, I never got sick, right? And it was a wonderful thing because with cerebral palsy, I don't know if you're the same way, but I tend to get sick quite a bit with respiratory stuff or, you know, colds or whatever. As you may hear in my voice, I wasn't getting sick for years, that was also because I was inside for years, but there was a strange, you know, you look at the skyline and there's nobody there. You look at the office buildings and they're empty. You know, there was a strange beauty that I don't know if I'm doing justice to, you know, because like, like you say, It was a city that never sleeps, but it was hibernating. It was hibernating that eventually it would come back and there would be a new normal, but I don't know how new the normal is anymore, but, there were highs and lows, and the lows were low. But when you could find that beauty of looking out and realizing that you were alive, you were alive in the most expensive city in the world. You were alive, and that was more than a lot of people could say at the time. And we, you know, we were lucky enough to get a deal on a one bedroom during the first wave, so we moved in our building, and so yeah, there were highs and lows, but I think it's something that we should definitely talk about. And, you know, being that the president that was in control during that time is now, finally, an indicted individual, I think we're gonna learn a lot more about the federal response, to that and, you know, the insurrection that happened during that and everything else, it's gonna be a really interesting, next year, I think and you know. I don't want to alienate any of your listeners, but I do want to say that the Trump Administration certainly had folks like us in the crosshairs. They were cutting food stamps, they were cutting work programs, they were making it harder for folks like us to get jobs and folks like us to get government assistance. And it wasn't only certain minority groups, it was also the disabled and I think people didn't realize that people don't understand. That people don't understand that we were in the process too so I just wanted to say that, put that out publicly because I think it's important. Can I take like two minutes and come back. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: So getting back to your art, and you're retiring this year. What are some pieces of your art that really stand out to you as you're looking back on your career? And you mentioned that you didn't achieve the commercial success that you wanted to, but what are some things that you did achieve that you are most proud of? And what are some things you wish you had achieved? Three part question, but all related to your art. Cary Goldberg: Yeah, for sure. I think piece wise, I think it all started really with a piece called Next Stop New Deli, which is the title of my second record. And it was written in a very dark time in my life. I had been forced to leave my third university, and I was staying in a motel, and I was probably at one of my lowest when I wrote that piece and it's the piece that people gravitate to the most as the capstone. And then, for me, doing A Prayer for Rhythm, in 2016 changed my life. It was the best work I've ever done. I'm so, so proud of what we did and I say we, because it really was a team effort. My engineer, Taylor DeRoy, who has done a number of my records. I love him like family. And yeah, I guess I wish that I was able to achieve my own fan base so that I would be able to self-sustain some kind of, you know, living, even if it was a side living, some living, doing art. I wish that I was able to put out more records. I wish that I had met my wife earlier because she handles my spoken word on Instagram. Hang on, I don't do Instagram, but my wife is a wizard at social media, but I'm not. I think that's something that you need. You know, but I think, again, you know, when you play with a band in the basement and you say to that band, they're going to come for you, like the record label, the management company. They're gonna come for you, like, be ready when that comes. And then seeing that come, right, and seeing that happen, you know, from the basement to, you know, my friends Hop Along from Philadelphia, they played Central Park this year, you know, sold out gig in Central Park, like, you know, that's fucking crazy, but like you, you know, you, I hope I can curse, I hope I can curse. But, you know, it's crazy, and to have seen it before before it happened, I mean, that, I can't think of anything, just, I mean, what a feeling, you know? Good people. If it's not me. And it's not going to be me, you know, I want to get a documentary done. I've been trying for a number of years, but it's not going to be me. I mean, that was the main thing too, getting a documentary done. That was something I really wanted to get my story out there the right way. But if it's not going to be me, it's going to be good people. It's going to be the Hop Along and the Pine Groves and the, you know, and, you know, I have so much gratitude for everyone that I've come across over the years. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: So what are three to five action steps that you can give the next generation of performers, be them spoken word artists like yourself. Poets like Liv Mammone, comics, musicians, what would be the knowledge that you would like to impart to them? Cary Goldberg: It is very important to have a well rounded life. When I started, shows were all I did. Shows were all I went to. All my friends in my life were around shows and performing, and that's not a well rounded life. So you can be an artist and do your art and perform and have that and love that and give yourself to that, but you can also have a life and go to prom and, you know, sustain and create relationships that you care about that have nothing to do with art. My wife didn't meet me through art. She didn't come to one of my shows, you know, until much later, when we were already together. So, you know, I think that's really important. I think understanding what it is that you do. And understanding that you're going to fail. You're going to bomb. Not every gig is going to be fucking great. There are going to be some rough nights. But try to take solace in the fact that you know what you're doing. And if I knew then what I know now, we'd probably be having this conversation on a much bigger platform. I'd probably be sitting in a penthouse somewhere, on an island or something. But you know, I guess I'm on the island of Manhattan. But, you know, I've learned a lot over the years. And I think the most important would be that. And then also, lastly, I know the value of your story, right? So many people over the years have said, Cary, we're going to make you a star kid, we're going to make you a star. And, it didn't work out right. But I gave so much credence to wanting to be a star, wanting to be something that I wasn't. You know, somebody asked me some years ago before COVID, he said, write me a piece, as if you were a disabled Superman. And I said no, I said, I'm not gonna write a piece that you want me to write so you can see me as the disabled artist all over, all over the country. Like, I'm happy to be a disabled artist if the money's right. Add a zero to the check. I'll come for your disability pride week at your college and I'll put on a great set, a great show, but like, I didn't want to be that. I wanted to be Cary, you know, and I didn't, I think when I was young and my friends became rock stars. I wanted that for myself, but I didn't have the understanding of who I was. And I just thought my time would come. I guess the last piece of advice would be, don't wait by the phone for 20 years for the call, because, if that doesn't come, you have to reckon with that, right? And that's a grief and a level on some level a disappointment that I'm now reckoning with. I wouldn't if I had a more well rounded life if I had a better understanding earlier of what my lane was and what I wanted to do, you know, maybe I wouldn't feel the way that I feel now. So, you know, proceed with caution. I wouldn't suggest starting out so young, but, it was what it was. It is what it is. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: So last question, my friend. This has been a very informative episode and I'm glad you were so forthright and brutally honest about your life and your opinions. I would like to think that both disabled advocates and those who have yet to discover and embrace their own disabilities, listen to this podcast. As my guests, what do you hope that disability advocates take away from this episode? And what do you hope that people who have yet to discover their own disabilities take away from this episode? Cary Goldberg: One of the most important lines that I ever wrote is, we're all sick with the human condition. It's really hard to be a good human, right? On any level. And as disabled people, sorry, this is gonna be a really long winded answer. But as disabled people, the world is not built for us, it just isn't, right? And I was hoping that in my lifetime, folks like you and I would get a seat at the table. You know, I think certain aspects of culture and certain projects and media have done a bit of service to us, but, I think we can do a lot more. And despite the fact that the world is not built for us, we have to tell our story because so many of us are unable to tell that story, because we can't do it in conventional ways, be it nonverbal, whatever it's going to be. But if you're listening to this and you're inspired in any way, tell your story, like, loudly, and whatever that means to you, because I think society on a lot of levels is built upon the tenant that people need to help people with disabilities in order to get a step up on Jacob's ladder, you know, they have some biblical need or desire to, you know, do that. And that's all well and good. That's great. But like, I would love it if, when I was out on the street, and my wife was with me, wearing our wedding rings, if people didn't think she was my nurse, you know? If people had an understanding that we're in this like anybody else, and we are persecuted just like anybody else. The way that we're persecuted is that society does not believe that our community can advocate for ourselves, can empower ourselves, and there's something to be said for minority groups that are persecuted out of some kind of societal fear, some kind of xenophobia or whatever the case may be. But there's also something to be said for a group that is persecuted, because society doesn't believe that they are worthy enough to. And that cannot be further from the truth. So, raise your voice, tell your story, forgive yourself, because being disabled is hard, and it's a lot on anybody, right? So, be kind to yourself, and understand, you know, there are resources. There are great resources. There are great communities on social media that will validate your struggle. And if any of your listeners are out there and need somebody to talk to, I'm always here for anybody. Reach out to me. I am not hard to find, and, you know, we'll get through it and hopefully, at the end of it all, the community is better off, more empowered, and has that seat at the table. That is my hope. So I hope that answers the question. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yes, it does. Thank you, my friend, Cary Goldberg. You can find his spoken word albums on Spotify, Bandcamp, and other streaming services. Cary, you have a big year ahead of you as you retire from the spoken word performer and advance into the next great chapter in your life. I look forward to seeing you again soon, my friend, in-person. Say hi to your wife for me and thank you again for coming on my podcast. Cary Goldberg: Yeah, thank you for having me and love to you and your family and I'll catch you when you're in New York soon. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Take care my friend. Cary Goldberg: All right, you too. Take care. Keith: You have been listening to Disability Empowerment Now. I would like to thank my guest, You, our listener and the Disability Empowerment Team that made this episode possible. More information about the podcast can be found at DisabilityEmpowermentNow.com or on social media @disabilityempowermentnow. The podcast is available wherever you listen to podcasts or on the official website. Don’t forget to rate, comment, and share the podcast! This episode of Disability Empowerment Now is copyrighted 2023. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Bienvenidos a Disability Empowerment Now, temporada tres. Soy su anfitrión Keith Murfee-DeConcini. Hoy estoy hablando con mi muy buen amigo Cary Goldberg, que es un auditor músico y expositor en Nueva York, que está trabajando con varias empresas de empredimiento. Cary, bienvenido al podcast. Cary Goldberg: Gracias por tenerme Keith. Hacía mucho tiempo que no nos poníamos al día y estoy deseando entrar en materia. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, estaba pensando en cómo nos conocimos. Estábamos en una clase de electrónica, no, lo siento. Estábamos juntos en una clase de música clásica en la American University y el profesor nos presentó delante de toda la clase, asumiendo que ambos teníamos parálisis cerebral y asumiendo que todas las personas con parálisis cerebral tenían la misma relación con nuestra discapacidad y eso fue muy, muy incómodo, pero comenzó una amistad de más de 17 años. Eres uno de mis amigos más queridos y he actuado contigo en el pasado. ¿Cómo, en primer lugar… mi memoria me sirve directamente para recordar cómo nos conocimos? Cary Goldberg: Recuerdo que fue en la clase de teoría musical de Sapkowski. No recuerdo exactamente los términos, pero creo que nos presentó juntos en algún momento. Y entonces se formó un elenco salvaje de personajes, con muchos de los cuales he mantenido el contacto todos estos años. Chris Moreno, Ethan Smith. Así que sí, me he mantenido en contacto con mucha de esa gente y sí, creo que así es como nos conocimos y luego conocí a tu familia y cuando has estado en Nueva York, nos hemos puesto al día. Así que, sí, ya sabes, un buen amigo desde hace mucho tiempo. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, es increíble que recuerdes el nombre del profesor y tienes razón, era una clase de teoría musical. Recuerdo que hice un disco clásico para esa clase porque es la primera y única vez que he utilizado el Music Notation Program Finale que dicta composiciones clásicas, y el profesor se enteró de que tenía parálisis cerebral. Debí decírselo, e inmediatamente te señaló y dijo, ay, él también tiene parálisis cerebral, que fue una de las formas más extrañas de presentarte y conocer así a uno de tus muy buenos amigos. Me alegro de que hayas mantenido el contacto con muchas de esas personas. No he mantenido el contacto con ninguno de ellos, aparte de ti, claro. Creo que en ese entonces tú estabas ahí como estudiante de tiempo completo y yo necesitaba un año sabático y un impulso musical. ¿Cómo empezaste a dedicarte a dar charlas? Cary Goldberg: Empecé como cómico, haciendo espectáculos de punk y hardcore cuando era joven, cuando tenía 15 años, y se suponía que era un acuerdo de una noche. Y he estado ahora… este es mi 20 aniversario como artista. Lo siento estoy un poco ronco hoy, pero sí, empecé en 2003 y ahora es 2023, pero lo que pasó fue, yo estaba haciendo comedia stand-up y luego me di cuenta muy rápidamente, quiero decir, después de un número de años. En realidad, esto es interesante para el podcast, para tus oyentes. Estaba viendo una reposición de South Park a altas horas de la noche, y vi al personaje Timmy, y en realidad nunca he visto la serie. Y me di cuenta de que la gente me estaba equiparando como alguien con PC a Timmy. Y eso me llevó a cambiar lo que estaba haciendo. Hice música durante un período muy corto de tiempo con un amigo mío de American, en realidad. Y produjimos un disco en mi dormitorio. Y entonces yo estaba regalando ese disco a la gente para darse a conocer. Y una de las personas a las que se lo di era un músico parapléjico llamado Vic Chesnutt. Así que nos hicimos buenos amigos y cada vez que él estaba de gira, yo iba a verle y le saludaba, y tuvimos una amistad muy complicada porque él sufría de dolor crónico, como todos sufrimos en algún nivel, pero sufría de verdad, y terminó quitándose la vida en 2009. Y un día dije, simplemente voy a reservar un concierto y sólo voy a hablar, sólo voy a hablar, hablar de mi amigo, hablar de mi vida. Voy a hablar de donde estoy. Y eso llevó a los últimos 12 años de dar charlas. Quiero decir, la pandemia cambió mucho, pero, antes de eso, ya sabes, yo era bastante activo y me voy a retirar este año para comenzar la etapa de planificación familiar con mi esposa y centrarme en eso y, ya sabes, 20 años como artista es mucho tiempo, así que creo que he dado suficiente. Y, creo que uno de los aspectos más apreciados de mi carrera ha sido tocar con músicos y telonear a bandas que acaban llegando mucho más lejos. Tocando en festivales, convirtiéndose en estrellas del rock, etcétera. Y eso es algo que realmente me gustaba vivir indirectamente a través de eso y ayudarles a través de eso a veces. Y así, me gustaría, mi objetivo es trabajar detrás de las escenas en el futuro para tratar de conseguir que los artistas sean reconocidos y conseguir, ya sabes, en las etiquetas correctas, las vías correctas para conseguir que tengan éxito porque, ya sabes, cuando has sido parte de ese viaje, tuve la suerte, ya sabes, cuando empecé la banda local, con My Chemical Romance y, ya sabes, cuando estás alrededor de eso y ves que la ascensión cuando estás, quiero decir, incluso en una escala muy pequeña, si eres parte de ese viaje, es algo realmente especial. Así que, ya sabes, surgir en esa escena de Jersey y luego más tarde entrar en el mundo del jazz y el mundo del rock y ser parte de múltiples viajes en algún nivel, ha sido muy gratificante. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Así que vi uno de tus publicaciones en las redes sociales que se han encontrado con un cantante de una banda de rock que he estado escuchando durante años, además de My Chemical Romance. Art Alexakis, el cantante de Everclear. ¿Es cierto? Cary Goldberg: Sí, sí. Quiero decir, no lo conozco a nivel personal. Nos conocimos una noche después de un concierto y escribí un artículo sobre él porque fue una interacción muy interesante, pero sí. So Much For the After Glow fue el primer disco que compré de niño, en una cinta de casette. Y me gasté esa cinta de casette y, por lo que la banda, en algún nivel, siempre tendrá, siempre tienen un espacio para mí. También tocaron American cuando estuve allí. No sé si estabas allí para eso, pero tocaron, tuve que decirle a Art, ya sabes, este es mi primer disco. Así que fue agradable. Es un tipo complicado, pero es un buen tipo. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí. Felicidades por tu matrimonio. Mencionate que te jubilas. ¿Cómo fue tomar la decisión de retirarte después de haber sido músico en varios aspectos, de varias formas diferentes, durante 20 años? Cary Goldberg: Sí, ya sabes. Yo no me llamaría músico, sino más bien artista. He hecho mis pinitos en la música, pero sobre todo dejo la música a los profesionales y me mantengo en mi línea. Pero, ya sabes, llegamos a la decisión mutuamente porque, ya sabes, no creo que haya nada más importante en la vida que criar una familia. Y, no puedo estar saliendo de noche y, ya sabes, en St. Louis o donde sea y dejar a mis hijos en casa con mi esposa, ya sabes. Y hablamos de, como, incluso si todo sucediera para mí y yo estaba haciendo, ya sabes, una vida como artista, ¿funcionaría? Y mi esposa dijo, no quiero ser una madre soltera en ningún nivel. Así que dije, está bien, dame un show más y voy a hacer eso este año. Y luego vamos a tocar madera, tener algunos hijos y, ya sabes, vivir la vida familiar, por así decirlo. Creo que se apagó tu micrófono. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Lo siento por eso. Cary Goldberg: No hay problema. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: ¿Cómo conociste a su esposa? Por supuesto que ya lo sé, he oído esa historia. Es muy interesante y divertida, ¿te importaría contarla? Cary Goldberg: Sí, nos conocimos en una aplicación llamada Coffee Meets Bagel. Que básicamente la premisa es que tienes al menos una conexión mutua en las redes sociales. Y su pregunta para romper el hielo fue que había visto a Bruce Springsteen 18 veces o algo así. Y yo estaba como, está bien, realmente no me gusta Bruce, pero yo soy de Jersey y como, puedo entender eso. Así que hablamos durante dos meses antes de vernos debido a su horario. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Espera, ¿escuché bien? Acabas de decir que hablaron durante dos meses antes de conocerse. Cary Goldberg: Sí, sí. Ella trabajaba en el turno de noche como enfermera en ese momento. Y ella estaba muy ocupada y el trabajo nunca se prestó a las citas, en realidad, pero hablábamos por teléfono durante ocho horas al día. Quiero decir, ya sabes, así que una vez que llegó a mi puerta, yo sabía mucho sobre ella. Pongámoslo así. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Eso esperaría si estuvieras hablando día tras día o algo así. Cary Goldberg: Sí, y funcionó debido a esa época de mi vida. Yo me dedicaba al mundo del jazz y me quedaba despierto hasta tarde. Ella trabajaba en turnos de noche, así que podía enviarle mensajes de texto para asegurarme de que estaba bien y estar a su lado. Y ella manejaba hasta la ciudad, venía a verme, y luego dormíamos y nos despertábamos. Ya sabes, en medio del día y hacerlo todo de nuevo. Pero hemos estado juntos siete años y acabamos de celebrar nuestro primer aniversario de boda y ya sabes, no hay nadie con quien preferiría estar en una trinchera que con mi esposa. Ella es increíble. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Eso es muy cierto y admirable. Así que te retiras en mayor parte. Una de, si no la más noble razón por la que un hombre puede retirarse, la vida dar charlas. A lo largo de tus 20 años de carrera, ¿cuántos álbumes dirías que has publicado? Cary Goldberg: Bueno, hice dos discos de comedia, que nadie encontrará y luego hice un disco de música que nadie encontrará. Y luego seis discos de charlas, algo así. Los puedes encontrar en las redes sociales, ah no… en streaming, Spotify, Apple Music. Así que esa es la ruta, pero quiero decir, en total, tal vez 12 discos y varios medios de comunicación. Sé que eres bastante prolífico. Creo que has hecho más de 12. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Moonlight Tranquility es un álbum electrónico bajo el nombre de Ole Tips. Y he estado haciendo eso durante casi 20 años. Llevo haciéndolo desde 2005 y fácilmente he sacado más de 40 discos o EPs, y estoy reteniendo muchas cosas porque realmente no puedo seguir el ritmo de mi propia música y mi trabajo diario. Pero sí, y realmente no hablo de eso, también he sacado algunos discos en solitario, algunos discos de banda, y como mencioné al principio cómo nos conocimos, en un álbum de composición clásica en American, y así, ha sido un camino interesante para mí, musicalmente. Si nos hubiéramos conocido antes y me hubieras hecho la profecía o lo que fuera de que me dedicaría a la electrónica, aunque fuera por unos pocos discos, y mucho menos casi 20 años después, me habría reído y te habría dicho, ¿quién eres tú? Creo que te equivocaste de persona, porque eso no es algo que yo haya imaginado nunca. Quiero decir, ese no es realmente mi estilo de música. Eso no es lo que crecí escuchando, excepto cuando me acordé de que crecí escuchando las bandas sonoras de videojuegos de Sonic the Hedgehog, y por lo que realmente, sin mi conciencia el conocimiento de estar bañándose en la música electrónica y me metí en Starstack, Lindsey Stirling es una violinista eléctrica a quien le tengo mucho respeto. Así que me he dedicado a escuchar mucho antes, y también mucho después conscientemente, de lo que me he dedicado a hacer música. Pero, sí, son interesantes los giros y vueltas que la vida te da creativamente. Cary Goldberg: Sobre el tema de la música de videojuegos, conozco a unos cuantos músicos de jazz a los que les apasiona la música de videojuegos y han hecho composiciones de jazz de Sonic y Mario y Kirby y todos esos juegos y, de hecho, había una orquesta que fue nominada a un Grammy este año. Creo que se llama 8 Bit Orchestra y muchos de mis amigos estaban en esa banda, y quiero hacer un reconocimiento especial a un gran saxofonista que se mudó a Japón para dedicarse más a la música de videojuegos. Se llama Patrick Bartley. Es uno de mis buenos amigos. Y si alguna vez lo ves en un concierto o ves, ya sabes, tienes gente en Japón que, ya sabes, quiere ir a un club de jazz. Si alguna vez ven a Patrick Slim en un Marquee, prepárense porque es una bestia. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, la música de videojuegos, los videojuegos en general y los juegos de la computadora también están en esa categoría. Dentro de más de los últimos 10 años, se han expandido muchísimo en el nivel de la narración y el nivel de los efectos visuales, sin duda, pero también la música es increíble cómo puedo encender y escuchar una banda sonora. Y no importa si he jugado al juego o si conozco el juego en cuestión, la música es simplemente increíble y no necesitan tener letra, aunque muchos de ellos sí tienen voz. Pero sí, los videojuegos y los juegos de computadora son su propia forma de arte y cada vez son mejores. Así que cualquiera que intente atribuirlos a un entretenimiento sin sentido se lo está perdiendo y no sabe de lo que está hablando. Y lo hemos visto crecer en la última década. Y alejándonos de eso, como mencioné, cómo nos conocimos, al principio de la entrevista, tú también tienes parálisis cerebral. Y también has sido artista en charlas, intérprete, te he visto en algunos shows. ¿Cómo ha influido tu discapacidad en tu arte, en tu estilo de actuación y en tu trabajo? Cary Goldberg: En cierto modo, ha influido en todos los sentidos, y en otros, en ninguno. Por supuesto, mi trabajo tiende a ser bastante personal, pero nunca he escrito sobre mi discapacidad porque pensaba que era una muleta. Es algo fácil, fácil sobre lo que escribir. Y entonces, mucho antes de mi mujer, estaba saliendo con una mujer y era Año Nuevo y sus padres llamaron y ella los puso en altavoz. Y dijeron, y yo los había conocido una semana antes o algo así. Y dijeron, no salgas con ese tipo, es judío discapacitado, y probablemente te lastime si sales con él o algo así. Y, sí, ese fue el final de eso. Pero eso me inspiró a escribir un poco sobre mi discapacidad. Así que, ya sabes, tengo algunas piezas que se relacionan con esa comunidad y hay algunos grandes, grandes poetas, Liv Mammone es un gran poeta con parálisis cerebral. Y, ya sabes, realmente quiero pasar la antorcha a la próxima generación de grandes escritores en algún nivel. Pero, sí, quiero decir, tengo razón sobre mi discapacidad, pero más sobre mi vida, y en cierto nivel, como sabes, con la parálisis cerebral, todo se ve afectado por la parálisis cerebral. Y en cierto modo, todos vivimos juntos en el mundo como seres humanos. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, mencionaste a Liv Mammone, ella es una poeta muy joven, pero es más sabia que sus años, sobre todo en su estilo de escritura. Gracias por mencionarla. Volviendo al comienzo de su carrera, tú empezaste, si no recuerdo mal, como humorista. Sacaste algunos álbumes de comedia que dirías que nadie encontrará, seguro que tienes tus razones para ello. ¿Cómo fue la transición de cómico a artista de la palabra e intérprete? Cary Goldberg: Me acuerdo. Ahora que me refrescaste la memoria, estuviste en una de mis grabaciones que hicimos en American. Hay un disco llamado Anytime They Will Speak of This. Creo que en cierto nivel, lo siento, como cómico, siempre quise fomentar la conversación sobre quién era, quién soy, y realmente impactar a la gente a un nivel más profundo que simplemente, ya sabes, conseguir una carcajada. Y no funcionó como cómico porque, ya sabes, actuaba en clubes de comedia y la gente decía que la gente venía a beber no a pensar, ya sabes, los promotores. Por eso me inclino más por los conciertos y telonear a grupos, porque en los shows la gente va a pensar. La gente está allí para cambiar de opinión. Están allí por causas sociales y para conectar con otras personas. Si estás en una multitud de gente, por ejemplo, conectas a nivel físico, a nivel visceral, con la música. Pero, si escuchas mi set, muchas veces hago llorar a la gente porque mi material resuena en ellos a un nivel profundo y eso, para mí, es mi trabajo, hacer que mi trabajo sea lo suficientemente agradable y fuerte como para que resuene y, ya sabes, así que creo que, de última instancia, fue una progresión natural y, ya sabes, tengo una foto de mi amigo, Vic, en esa pared, y la miro todos los días, y, ya sabes, le doy las gracias, porque nada de esto habría sucedido sin él. Y he tenido algunas experiencias salvajes que creo que son en parte gracias a él y estoy muy agradecido por ello, mi carrera, aunque no he logrado el tipo de éxito comercial que uno quiere. He tenido algunas interacciones increíbles. He sido capaz de experimentar un montón de cosas diferentes. Y, ya sabes, soy un hombre viejo ahora, pero estoy muy agradecido por el tiempo que tuve. Ya sabes, creo, ya sabes, creo que tenemos, tenemos que hablar de ello, hombre. La pandemia en Nueva York, fue, um, una experiencia loca. Acababa de anunciar la continuación de mi disco de jazz con 21 músicos de todo el mundo. Es un disco de jazz llamado A Prayer for Rhythm. Y yo había anunciado que A Prayer for Reckoning iba a salir ese otoño y una semana después, COVID cerró mi ciudad y cerró el mundo y cambió toda mi visión del mundo. Y ya sabes, pasé 18 meses dentro y ya sabes, volver a la vida es un poco más difícil. Tú sabes, así, y el ajuste de cuentas que estoy esperando era más de un ajuste de cuentas político, que, por extraño que parezca, creo, lo siento por eso. Mi perro quería ser parte del podcast por un momento. Sí, yo estaba realmente esperando un ajuste de cuentas político y, parece que a partir de ayer, podríamos estar recibiendo ese ajuste de cuentas finalmente. Pero creo que COVID en muchos niveles fue un ajuste de cuentas, un tipo diferente de ajuste de cuentas que yo no estaba anticipando, que nadie estaba anticipando, pero, ya sabes, estar en el epicentro de todo eso. Creo que mi mujer y yo estaríamos casados de todas formas, pero decidimos casarnos. Y la pandemia tuvo mucho que ver con eso porque vivíamos en un apartamento estudio, y yo estaba dentro, y ella hacía la compra, y recogía el correo, y, ya sabes, me mantenía a salvo, y paseaba al perro, y todo eso, ya sabes. Me habría muerto absolutamente si me hubiera quedado en la oficina en la que estaba trabajando, una semana después del cierre, el tipo detrás de mí estaba en un ventilador, y casi se muere. El tipo que estaba dos filas más abajo de mí, su padre falleció y la compañera de trabajo que se sentaba frente a mí, se contagió de COVID bastante mal en la primera ola. Así que tuve mucha, mucha suerte, y quiero decir, justo antes de COVID, yo estaba jugando la serie mundial de póquer en Atlantic City, y había una serie de jugadores asiáticos que llevaban máscaras y guantes, y pensé bueno, qué brillante estrategia de juego es esa. Asustaba a la gente, ya sabes, pero no era un juego de estrategia en absoluto. Pero, ya sabes, como jugador de póquer, no esperas que todo vaya tan bien. Pero ya sabes, no me di cuenta hasta el julio pasado. Y en ese momento estaba triplemente vacunado y aún así me puse muy enfermo. Pero hombre, estoy muy agradecido de haberlo superado, y, ya sabes, es una parte de nuestra historia, y es una parte de nuestro trauma colectivo con el que creo que vamos a vivir durante mucho tiempo, y creo que la gente tiene que hablar de ello en algún nivel, ya sabes, y no queremos actuar como si ya no estuviera aquí. Queremos actuar como si hubiera desaparecido, queremos actuar como si nunca hubiera sucedido, pero si vivieras aquí, en Nueva York, y tuvieran morgues improvisadas en la calle, y estuvieras esperando cada mañana la conferencia de prensa de Cuomo, para que te dijera cuántas personas murieron el día anterior, es algo que nunca olvidaré. Es algo que nunca olvidaré, algo que nos unió a mi esposa y a mí a un nivel que nunca he estado unido a nadie antes, en ese nivel, y, ya sabes, para las personas que estaban aquí, fue realmente algo fuerte, y yo estaba preocupado por ti, porque tú, lo recuerdo, COVID estalló. Fuiste de Nueva York a Arizona con tu familia y luego el COVID te siguió hasta Arizona. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, sí. Tuve que hacer una salida muy ingrata de Nueva York justo después de superar el COVID por primera vez, y luego lo volví a tener el año pasado, aunque el año pasado sabíamos de qué se trataba. La primera vez, nadie sabía qué era fuera de la comunidad médica. Pero sí, fue muy discordante. De hecho, la pandemia puso a Nueva York a dormir, entre comillas, por primera vez en mucho tiempo. La ciudad de Nueva York es famosa por ser la ciudad que nunca duerme, pero la pandemia, en su apogeo, la dejó fuera de combate. Entonces la ciudad realmente durmió. Cary Goldberg: No lo sé. Si estoy de acuerdo con eso, creo que era inquietante, diferente y extraño, pero había una belleza en ello, si pudieras encontrarla. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Cuéntame más sobre esa belleza. Cary Goldberg: Si pudieras encontrar el coraje para salir de casa. Tuvimos la suerte de tener un carro, y la suerte de que obtuvimos un pase de estacionamiento para discapacitados, así que pudimos estacionarnos en toda la ciudad e íbamos en carro solo para recoger comida, ya sabes, en la zona alta, en el centro, como todo el camino por FDR Drive y, quiero decir, si has estado en FDR Drive, no toma 10 minutos ir del centro al centro y nos tomó siete minutos manejar por la ciudad. No había nadie. No había nada. Todo fue, la ciudad se convirtió en el suburbio, por un tiempo. Y, ya sabes, creo, ya sabes, el ritual de todas las noches, a las siete en punto, de agradecer a los trabajadores de la salud aplaudiendo y chocando ollas y todo eso. Quiero decir, fue algo realmente maravilloso. Y, ya sabes, y finalmente la gente regresó y, ya sabes, todos regresaron de los Hamptons o dondequiera que estuvieran. Y ahora Nueva York ha vuelto a la normalidad en cierto nivel, pero todavía tiendo a usar una máscara porque cuando la usaba, nunca me enfermé, ¿verdad? Y fue algo maravilloso porque con la parálisis cerebral, no sé si a ti te pasa lo mismo, pero tiendo a enfermarme bastante con problemas respiratorios o, ya sabes, resfriados o lo que sea. Como pueden escuchar en mi voz, no me enfermé durante años, eso también se debió a que estuve adentro durante años, pero hubo una sensación extraña, ya sabes, miras el horizonte y no hay nadie allí. Miras los edificios de oficinas y están vacíos. Sabes, había una belleza extraña a la que no sé si le estoy haciendo justicia, ya sabes, porque, como dices, era una ciudad que nunca duerme, pero estaba hibernando. Estaba hibernando y eventualmente regresaría y habría una nueva normalidad, pero ya no sé qué tan nueva es la normalidad, pero hubo altibajos, y los mínimos fueron bajos. Pero cuando pudiste encontrar esa belleza de mirar hacia afuera y darte cuenta de que estabas vivo, estabas vivo en la ciudad más cara del mundo. Estabas vivo y eso era más de lo que mucha gente podía decir en ese momento. Y nosotros, ya sabes, tuvimos la suerte de conseguir un trato para una habitación de un dormitorio durante la primera ola, así que nos mudamos a nuestro edificio, y sí, hubo altibajos, pero creo que es algo de lo que definitivamente deberíamos hablar. Y, ya sabes, dado que el presidente que tenía el control durante ese tiempo es ahora, finalmente, un individuo acusado, creo que vamos a aprender mucho más sobre la respuesta federal, a eso y, ya sabes, la insurrección que sucedió durante eso y todo lo demás, el próximo año será realmente interesante, creo y ya sabes. No quiero alienar a ninguno de tus oyentes, pero sí quiero decir que la Administración Trump ciertamente tenía a personas como nosotros en la mira. Estaban recortando cupones de alimentos, estaban recortando programas de trabajo, estaban dificultando que personas como nosotros consiguieran empleo y que personas como nosotros obtuvieran asistencia del gobierno. Y no fueron sólo ciertos grupos minoritarios, también fueron los discapacitados y creo que la gente no se dio cuenta de que la gente no entiende. Que la gente no entiende que nosotros también estábamos en el proceso, así que solo quería decirlo, publicarlo públicamente porque creo que es importante. ¿Puedo tomarme unos dos minutos y volver? Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Volviendo a tu arte, te jubilarás este año. ¿Cuáles son algunas de tus obras de arte que realmente te destacan cuando recuerdas tu carrera? Y mencionaste que no lograste el éxito comercial que querías, pero ¿cuáles son algunas de las cosas que lograste de las que estás más orgulloso? ¿Y cuáles son algunas de las cosas que desearías haber logrado? Pregunta de tres partes, pero todas relacionadas con tu arte. Cary Goldberg: Sí, claro. Creo que todo comenzó realmente con una pieza llamada Next Stop New Deli, que es el título de mi segundo disco. Y fue escrito en un momento muy oscuro de mi vida. Me obligaron a dejar mi tercera universidad y me estaba quedando en un motel, y probablemente estaba en uno de mis peores momentos cuando escribí ese artículo y es el que más atrae a la gente como piedra angular. Y luego, para mí, hacer ana oración por el ritmo, en 2016, cambió mi vida. Fue el mejor trabajo que he hecho jamás. Estoy muy, muy orgulloso de lo que hicimos y digo nosotros, porque realmente fue un esfuerzo de equipo. Mi ingeniero, Taylor DeRoy, que ha hecho varios de mis discos. Lo amo como si fuera mi familia. Y sí, supongo que desearía poder conseguir mi propia base de fans para poder sustentarme de alguna manera, ya sabes, vivir, incluso si fuera una vida paralela, algo de vida, haciendo arte. Ojalá pudiera sacar más discos. Ojalá hubiera conocido a mi esposa antes porque ella maneja mis charlas en Instagram. Espera, no uso Instagram, pero mi esposa es una maga en las redes sociales, pero yo no. Creo que eso es algo que necesitas. Ya sabes, pero pienso, de nuevo, ya sabes, cuando tocas con una banda en el sótano y le dices a esa banda que vendrán por ti, como el sello discográfico, la compañía de gestión. Vendrán por ti y estarán preparados cuando eso llegue. Y luego ver eso venir, claro, y ver eso suceder, ya sabes, desde el sótano hasta, ya sabes, mis amigos Hop Along de Filadelfia, tocaron en Central Park este año, ya sabes, un concierto con entradas agotadas en Central Park, como, ya sabes, eso es una pinche locura, pero como tú, ya sabes, tú, espero poder decir groserías, espero poder decir groserías. Pero, ya sabes, es una locura, y haberlo visto antes de que sucediera, quiero decir, no puedo pensar en nada, simplemente, quiero decir, qué sentimiento, ¿sabes? Buena gente. Si no soy yo. Y no seré yo, ya sabes, quiero hacer un documental. Lo he estado intentando durante varios años, pero no voy a ser yo. Quiero decir, eso también era lo principal: hacer un documental. Eso era algo que realmente quería difundir mi historia de la manera correcta. Pero si no voy a ser yo, serán buenas personas. Serán Hop Along y Pine Groves y, ya sabes, y, ya sabes, tengo mucha gratitud por todos con los que me he cruzado a lo largo de los años. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Entonces, ¿cuáles son de tres a cinco pasos de acción que puedes darle a la próxima generación de artistas, ya sean artistas de la palabra hablada como tú? Poetas como Liv Mammone, cómicos, músicos, ¿cuáles serían los conocimientos que te gustaría transmitirles? Cary Goldberg: Es muy importante tener una vida equilibrada. Cuando comencé, lo único que hacía eran shows. A lo único que asistí fue a shows. Todos mis amigos en mi vida estaban en obras y actuando, y esa no es una vida completa. Entonces puedes ser un artista y hacer tu arte y actuar y tener eso y amar eso y entregarte a eso, pero también puedes tener una vida e ir al baile de graduación y, ya sabes, mantener y crear relaciones que te importen y que tengan nada que ver con el arte. Mi esposa no me conoció a través del arte. Ella no vino a uno de mis shows, ya sabes, hasta mucho más tarde, cuando ya estábamos juntos. Entonces, ya sabes, creo que eso es realmente importante. Pienso entender qué es lo que haces. Y entender que vas a fracasar. Vas a bombardear. No todos los conciertos van a ser jodidamente geniales. Van a pasar algunas noches difíciles. Pero trata de consolarte con el hecho de que sabes lo que estás haciendo. Y si supiera entonces lo que sé ahora, probablemente estaríamos teniendo esta conversación en una plataforma mucho más grande. Probablemente estaría sentado en un ático en algún lugar, en una isla o algo así. Pero sabes, supongo que estoy en la isla de Manhattan. Pero sabes, he aprendido mucho a lo largo de los años. Y creo que lo más importante sería eso. Y también, por último, sé el valor de tu historia, ¿verdad? Mucha gente a lo largo de los años ha dicho: Cary, te vamos a convertir en un niño estrella, te vamos a convertir en una estrella. Y no funcionó bien. Pero le di mucho crédito a querer ser una estrella, a querer ser algo que no era. Sabes, alguien me preguntó hace algunos años antes de COVID, me dijo, escríbeme un artículo, como si fueras un Superman discapacitado. Y dije que no, dije, no voy a escribir una pieza que tú quieras que escriba para que puedas verme como el artista discapacitado en todo el país. Estoy feliz de ser un artista discapacitado si tengo el dinero adecuado. Agregue un cero al cheque. Iré a tu semana del orgullo por la discapacidad en tu universidad y haré un gran set, un gran show, pero no quería ser eso. Quería ser Cary, ya sabes, y no lo hice, creo que cuando era joven y mis amigos se convirtieron en estrellas de rock. Quería eso para mí, pero no entendía quién era. Y pensé que llegaría mi momento. Supongo que el último consejo sería: no esperes 20 años junto al teléfono para recibir la llamada, porque si no llega, tendrás que contar con eso, ¿no? Y eso es un dolor y, en cierto nivel, una decepción con la que ahora estoy teniendo en cuenta. No lo haría si tuviera una vida más completa, si hubiera comprendido mejor antes cuál era mi camino y qué quería hacer, ya sabes, tal vez no me sentiría como me siento ahora. Así que ya sabes, procede con precaución. No sugeriría empezar tan joven, pero era lo que era. Es lo que es. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Última pregunta, amigo mío. Este ha sido un episodio muy informativo y me alegra que hayas sido tan franco y brutalmente honesto acerca de tu vida y tus opiniones. Me gustaría pensar que tanto los defensores de las personas con discapacidad como aquellos que aún tienen que descubrir y aceptar sus propias discapacidades escuchen este podcast. Como invitados míos, ¿qué esperas que los defensores de la discapacidad se lleven de este episodio? ¿Y qué esperas que las personas que aún no han descubierto sus propias discapacidades se lleven de este episodio? Cary Goldberg: Una de las líneas más importantes que he escrito es que todos estamos enfermos con la condición humana. Es muy difícil ser un buen ser humano, ¿verdad? En cualquier nivel. Y como personas discapacitadas, lo siento, esta será una respuesta muy larga. Pero como personas discapacitadas, el mundo no está hecho para nosotros, simplemente no lo está, ¿verdad? Y esperaba que en mi vida, gente como tú y yo obtuviéramos un asiento en la mesa. Sabes, creo que ciertos aspectos de la cultura y ciertos proyectos y medios nos han prestado un poco de servicio, pero creo que podemos hacer mucho más. Y a pesar de que el mundo no está hecho para nosotros, tenemos que contar nuestra historia porque muchos de nosotros no podemos contarla, porque no podemos hacerlo de manera convencional, ya sea no verbal, sea lo que sea. Pero si estás escuchando esto y estás inspirado de alguna manera, cuenta tu historia, en voz alta, y lo que sea que eso signifique para ti, porque creo que la sociedad en muchos niveles se basa en el inquilino que la gente necesita, ayudar a las personas con discapacidades a subir un escalón en la escalera de Jacob, ya sabes, tienen alguna necesidad o deseo bíblico de hacerlo. Y eso está muy bien. Genial. Pero me encantaría que, cuando estuviera en la calle y mi esposa estuviera conmigo, usando nuestros anillos de boda, la gente no pensara que ella era mi enfermera, ¿sabes? Si la gente entendiera que estamos en esto como cualquier otra persona y que somos perseguidos como cualquier otra persona. La forma en que somos perseguidos es que la sociedad no cree que nuestra comunidad pueda defendernos a nosotros mismos, empoderarnos, y hay algo que decir sobre los grupos minoritarios que son perseguidos por algún tipo de miedo social, algún tipo de xenofobia o cualquiera sea el caso. Pero también hay algo que decir sobre un grupo que es perseguido, porque la sociedad no cree que sean lo suficientemente dignos de hacerlo. Y eso no puede estar más lejos de la verdad. Así que alza la voz, cuenta tu historia, perdónate, porque ser discapacitado es duro y depende mucho de cualquiera, ¿no? Entonces, se amable contigo mismo y comprende que existen recursos. Hay grandes recursos. Hay excelentes comunidades en las redes sociales que validarán tu lucha. Y si alguno de tus oyentes está ahí fuera y necesita alguien con quien hablar, siempre estoy aquí para ayudar. Hablame. No soy difícil de encontrar y, ya sabes, lo superaremos y, con suerte, al final de todo, la comunidad estará mejor, más empoderada y tendrá ese asiento en la mesa. Esa es mi esperanza. Así que espero que eso responda la pregunta. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, lo es. Gracias, amigo mío, Cary Goldberg. Pueden encontrar sus álbumes de palabra hablada en Spotify, Bandcamp y otros servicios de transmisión. Cary, tienes un gran año por delante mientras te retiras de la palabra hablada y avanzas hacia el próximo gran capítulo de tu vida. Espero volver a verte pronto, amigo mío, en persona. Saluda a tu esposa de mi parte y gracias nuevamente por venir a mi podcast. Cary Goldberg: Sí, gracias por invitarme y te quiero a ti y a tu familia y te veré pronto cuando estés en Nueva York. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Cuídate, amigo mío. Cary Goldberg: Muy bien, tú también. Cuidate.

Other Episodes

Episode 0

February 26, 2023 01:04:45
Episode Cover

S2 Episode 15 with LeAnna Lucero

LeAnna Lucero is a recreational therapist. Keith and Lucero first met when they were in the Arizona LEND program in 2017. They actually co-taught...

Listen

Episode 0

June 25, 2022 00:46:50
Episode Cover

Episode 5 with Dennis DeConcini

Dennis DeConcini is a former United States Senator who served in public office at the same time the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) was...

Listen

Episode 0

March 03, 2024 01:09:04
Episode Cover

The power of Stage Acting with Ann Marie Morelli

Ann Marie has had a diverse and accomplished career in acting, with a range of roles spanning classical works like “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”...

Listen