S3 Episode 9 With Scott Seldin

November 05, 2023 01:01:23
S3 Episode 9 With Scott Seldin
Disability Empowerment Now
S3 Episode 9 With Scott Seldin

Nov 05 2023 | 01:01:23

/

Show Notes

After a B.A. in English from American University in Washington D.C. and an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from the Instituto Allende, University of Guanajuato, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, Scott taught literature and composition at Baruch College for fifteen years in New York City, while freelancing as a photographer (scottseldinphotography.com). In 1982, Scott wrote Yes, Boss, published by Blythe-Pennington, LTD.

After moving to Santa Fe, he worked as director of Mountain View School on the Adolescent Psychiatric Unit of St. Vincent Hospital in Santa Fe, followed by eleven years as academic coordinator and personal development coach at The College of Santa Fe. At the College, he created and supervised a successful student peer mentor program and worked with students to co-produce fourteen events and projects.

The College of Santa Fe closed in 2009, and in subsequent years, Scott received training as a mediator, worked as a personal development coach, wrote Mentoring Human Potential, published in 2011 by iUniverse, Inc. and created Explorations of Spirit and Creativity, which offered a series of six workshops in Santa Fe with co-presenter La'ne' Sa'n Moonwalker.

In 2022, Scott published My Out of the Blue Stories, which he wrote during the previous year.

Find the Transcript here.

Encuentre la transcripción aquí.

Disability Empowerment Now is produced by Pascal Albright.

View Full Transcript

Episode Transcript

Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Welcome to Disability Empowerment Now, season Three. Today, I'm talking to a very dear friend of mine and former mentor, Scott Seldin who I met at the then College of Santa Fe in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He is a mentor, life coach, photographer, author, who regularly mentors people with disabilities. Scott, welcome to the show. Scott Seldin: Thanks for having me as a guest on your show. It is such an incredible contribution that you're making, so I want to honor that right from the start. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Thank you very much. We are here today to talk about the College of Santa Fe, how we met, and your new memoir. Which is called My Out of the Blue Stories: One Man Journey through Life. We will put the image up more clearly on the website, and in the promo. I just finished it the other night, and like I was telling you, in the preamble before we started recording, I did not expect the format of the book, some 60 odd short stories, to really be that engaging and I really thought I knew you and I did know you so well, once upon a time, but reading your book, it illuminated so much more to me and so your book and the format you chose is excellent. Scott Seldin: Well, thank you. And the format came quite naturally because my approach was to start with my earliest memories and to go through each year and to try to recall any story from that period year, could be two years old, four years old, six years old, any story that has stayed with me and still has meaning for me. And that might have meaning for other people. So that's how the format came, you know, some of the stories are maybe five or six sentences, the earliest ones. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: I also found out that Scott is your middle name and not your first name, and that you were born premature as well. Scott Seldin: Well, no, no, I wasn't born prematurely. That opening about being in utero? Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yes. Scott Seldin: Let me see if I can find it here. You know, I started with not a memory of being in utero, but something happened during that time. And for viewers, it's such a brief story, I could just read it. “Though I don't remember being in utero, I imagine it is dark, and I'm living in a sack of amniotic love. My timeless world is sweet and secure. I explore it gently with my legs and hands, comforted by muffled sounds. Suddenly, the world I've been living in for seven and a half months disappears when my mother is told that her father has died. I'm immersed in her grief. And time begins for me.” Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yeah, I can see the confusion in the assumption I jumped to, thank you for explaining it. Scott Seldin: Yeah sure. My mother was an exquisitely loving human being. So being in the pre-birth amniotic sac, I imagine must have just been bliss for any being in that situation. And then when she hears that, she's told, and she doesn't know that her father is ill and is dying when she's told that, the grief is overwhelming. And in my imagination, I think that must have totally changed my world. And had an impact in subtle and maybe not some not so subtle ways throughout my life in terms of the extremes, the extremes of love and bliss and the extremes of experiencing grief and having empathy for people and compassion for people because when you feel what someone else is feeling you. It reminds me of a Bob Marley quote from a song, a quote from a song where he sings, “only he who feels it knows it.” Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yeah, that’s very, very true. I've been thinking about you a lot, and how we first met at college. It must have been the fall of 2017. Sorry of 2007. Yeah, big difference and you were probably one of the first people I had met at TRIO. Which was the college's Disability Resource Center, as it was, other than that. Scott Seldin: Well, we work with people with disabilities and we also worked with the first generation to go to college and also people who had financial difficulties growing up and families. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yeah. Yeah. I mean we obviously became fast professional and close friends throughout the years, but I am trying to remember some of the first impressions I've had of you, and I've told you this before, that time seems like several lifetimes ago, to be honest. It's very funny how time rearranges things, certain memories. You mentioned having a clear memory of my New York apartment, and I do have a clear memory of your office at the college. But what was said, how we were introduced, I’m blanking on. Scott Seldin: I remember it, you came into my office with your parents and we sat down, you know, we talked, we introduced ourselves. And my impression of your parents was that they were very supportive and loving people and they had come with you to ease this introduction to me and to our department, and what I really liked about the way it unfolded was that they were not controlling of our time together. They allowed space for you to emerge as who you are and I really appreciated that and it spoke very well of the two of them. And we did become fast friends. There was something that we understood about each other. At least this was my impression, my sense memory, that we understood something about each other that, you know, there's some people you just really connect with. And you just have a sense of who they are and that it's a safe space, you know, and that's how I remember our meeting. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yeah, over the three or four years, I think it was three and a half actually. We became quite close because we shared a similar philosophy towards our life and it expanded as I tried to navigate the college scene and being immersed in the town of Santa Fe, or the city, excuse me, the city of Santa Fe, and what I've learned through your memoir is this type of mentoring is nothing new to you. You have done it in one form or another for decades upon decades. And I mean, There are so many stories in this book that bear mentioning and bear, and I love talking about, and that's even before we get to the section on Santa Fe and where you mention me, and then you mention Daniel, and then you continue. I love how it ends. And it goes right back, it has that beginning as when you, yourself, were in college, and you were, you've been down this road before, that's the final sentence of the book and of the memoir and I'm like, I know exactly what he means by that. It's like the chapter titles are so apt. I know more about your family through this book than when we trained, when we trained together as mentor and mentee. You're famously one of the more reclusive persons I've met, and that's not a bad thing at all. It's just who you are and who you developed. In reading the book, I can see exactly why, or some of the reasons why have you developed the way you have? Scott Seldin: Well to put it in a sentence. It's rough out there. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yes, indeed. Scott Seldin: It really is and, for self protection, you know, it's so easy to lose what you feel is best in yourself when you try to fit into a culture that is highly competitive. And often disdainful of those that are perceived as in some way lesser than how you might think of yourself or where you think you are in the hierarchy of bullshit status. You know, and I have a keen memory of my first year in college and how alone I felt. And I didn't know who I could trust. I didn't know who was there to help me. There really were, at the time, very few people. I don't remember going to any mentor or coach or anybody. And you learn what you don't know. And it's rough, it’s rough. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yeah, one thing I really appreciated and loved immensely about your book is, about your memoir, is the stories were so diverse. Even the stories that took place in the same place. You weren't treading the same ground. You weren't repeating yourself. The characters came alive, the only thing that would have made the reading experience more enjoyable is if you had done an audiobook version, because, excuse me. Sorry, I forgot there was an active phone line behind me, and so I had to remove it. As I was saying, the stories were so personal and evocative that even without an audiobook version, and I geek out over audio books all the freaking time. I mean, it's unreal. I could appreciate the amount of detail you put into each scene. And it made me feel like I was alive and right there with you. From your childhood up until this moment right now. And that’s how, you know, the book works and it's effective when the reader can imagine they were actually there in every room, every scene with you. And so, your book is incredible. Scott Seldin: Thank you. Thank you. That's really what I had hoped it would be, the effect that it would have on the reader that they would be brought in. It's it's first person. This is happening now. And I tried not to put anything that didn't belong in the story. So it has a spareness and a fullness, I think, simultaneously. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yes, it definitely does. And so, what motivated you to write this book? I mean, I know you talk about it a little in the opening period, but really flesh it out more of why now? Scott Seldin: Why now? Well, I give, I think, four reasons why I wrote the book and certainly for my friends to get to know me better, to know myself better. There are different things. Two, you know, I have an excerpt from a letter that I received from my grandfather, and I got to know him and I got to know my father just for reading his letter about his life, but there was one, deep and perhaps deeper motivating cause, reason for writing the book and, I was in the 1960s with the Vietnam war that started when I was in college and I was an activist, an anti-war protester, and I created some demonstrations. It was, you know, to see a senseless, horrific war that the United States was participating in, in Vietnam, where we didn't know the culture, we didn't know the people. It was a civil war and we entered it with students and many older people. Being in college, in a way it took over because for a couple of reasons, one was that just as a human being to experience your own country, the country you love committing such horror in a foreign land with people, we don't we don't know them. So there was that. And the other reason and and one of the motivating forces for many students was that there was a draft and we could easily wind up in Vietnam ourselves. So there were 2 reasons why students were so active and it was such a distressing time to be a student, but it was also a very alive time to be a student because this was life and death and we wanted to end that war and we thought that once people understood what was really happening, that the war would end and that was our objective to end the war and, but it became very frustrating because there could be 200,000 people in Central Park, more protesting the war. Lyndon Johnson was the president and basically, these just became numbers of people who protested and we weren't seeing any change. And so, I then was in graduate school on Long Island and was living in a house with a couple of guys who were in graduate school, I believe. And I had an idea for a demonstration and before that, let me just go before that, I was arrested at a demonstration in New York City and the charges were dropped, but then I got an idea some months after that to change the thinking of people, the mindset about the war to have them understand themselves somehow better. And so the idea was basically, well, what happened was, and this is the motivation and underlying motivation because, I wound up being framed on a drug charge, and I did something that the demonstration walked right up to the line of wasn't I didn't do anything illegal. It was nonviolent, but it caused a shift in thinking. That was my intention that if people could just open the aperture on their own conditioned responses, that would help. And so I got the idea. I called a newspaper on Long Island. I said I made up a name for a student group, Students Against the War, and I called them up and I said that we were going to burn a dog with napalm, which was being used in Vietnam. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Any animal rights activists listening to this, and I hope you don't mind me saying, no dog or no animal was ever harmed. Scott Seldin: And I am as devoted an animal lover as you will ever find. For 20 years I've been putting kale out for the wild rabbits you know, I sing to the birds. That's who I am. So I said that I was going to burn the dog with no intention. I'm burning a dog with napalm and the newspaper printed. They had received a call and there was outrage. The ASPCA received calls, don't give any dogs to any hippies who are coming looking for a dog because they're going to burn a dog at the flagpole at noon on such and such a date. And so I set up a table in the cafeteria of the college students against the dog burning and I collected signatures and people were outraged that a dog was going to be burned with napalm. I went into New York City with a backpack and went to the war resisters league and I got a lot of pamphlets and things and came back. The day of the so-called dog burning, I led a march through the campus to the flagpole to protest the dog burn. And I had asked a woman I knew who was a terrific speaker. I had rented a bullhorn and asked her to speak and there was a large crowd of people gathered at the flagpole and the march through the campus joined that large group. And I had put together pamphlets with my roommates and I opened it up and women began to speak. And to give a speech and the people that we passed out these pamphlets and information about the war to everybody and they opened it up and it said, thank you for your protest against the burning of an innocent dog with napalm. Now, please turn your attention to the burning of innocent people with this same napalm in Vietnam. And it was a mind, you know, many students who had never come to a protest against the war were there to protect their dog. And I hope that it had that kind of impact and awakening. But, I suspect that there were people, there were people in suits and ties at this gathering, and I thought, well, you know, this is kind of odd. Anyway, I wound up being framed on a drug charge. It was a large drug bust out on Long Island. And they framed a number of political people, people who were involved in demonstrations. And this demonstration, the reaction was strong. And I think from their point of view, they felt I had crossed the line with this demonstration, even though it wasn't illegal it was unusual. And so I wound up being framed. So why did I write this book? When you are framed on a drug charge, when there's no truth to it, and people think of you as a drug dealer, it's your family name that has a stain on it, and it's very very painful. So I carried that trauma with me. Eventually, I refused to plead guilty to anything because I hadn't done anything. I spent some days, a few days in jail and are you there? Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yeah, I'm still here. Scott Seldin: So I spent a few days in jail, but it was the trauma of being seen as somebody, for doing something and at that time it was for like a half ounce of marijuana selling it. I never did that, but they frame me and some others. So that’s an underlying reason that I didn't put in the book, but I'm sharing it with you now, for writing the book because I had the transcript where I was found innocent and didn't have to go to trial because they reduced these charges to disorderly conduct. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yeah, that was the longest chapter in the book, or the longest story because of that transcript in which your last name was spelled incorrectly. Scott Seldin: Yeah exactly. Exactly. That's a long answer to your question about why I wrote it. And I now am going to be working with people who are writing their memoirs. I found this to be very therapeutic, very, very therapeutic because I had carried that with me. Writing that story lifted a lot of that trauma and people. If I'm working with somebody who's working on a memoir, that's part of the reason for writing the stories of your life. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Very well said. So let's get to the college and the section that we came up with, but that you really spearheaded in my mind and I'll read it verbatim from your book, because it's only like five paragraphs, but that’s all it needs to be five paragraphs. That's how concise you are as a writer. 2011, this page 149 in the book. It's the year 2011. It probably actually happened in 2008, but there's a reason why you put it in 2011 that will become clear, the disability and ability of love. “During the years that I walked at the College of Santa Fe, I coached many students who had diagnosed disabilities. This story is about someone named Daniel. But before I introduce you to him, I'll share a few relevant paragraphs from a book I wrote, Mentoring Human Potential, published in 2011 by iUniverse. Quote, step into the world of your mentees as you step more deeply into your own world. Is your limited ability to love turning those with documented disabilities into another. Keith Murfee, name used with permission, is a student I mentored with who has cerebral palsy? I exert an excerpt Keith wrote and gave at his church in Washington, DC. “Having a disability, it's challenging but it shouldn't lead to a depressed life, however, it often does because of the mindset people without disabilities have towards people with them. A friend and mentor, Scott Seldin, suggested I write a piece titled The Disability of Love. I was intrigued by the concept. We all have a disability, whether we know it or not, accept it or reject it. It is the need for love. The lack of awareness we bring to our inability to love is the disability that haunts us all. It is the common ground of life.” I was a very young pup when I wrote those words. I had just gotten fresh out of high school. I like to use metaphor and analogy, and while those words still hold some truth, I've flushed them out even more years later. But what about that passage struck you enough to include it in not just one book you wrote, Mentoring Human Potential, but also your memoir? Scott Seldin: Well, the disability of love is like a plague on humanity. While we're talking, there's such killing going on in the Middle East. It's unspeakable killing. You can't even, you know, but the disability of love. We see it expressed in, when I, earlier I said, it's rough out there. It's rough because there is this disability of love. And I, this is, this really expresses what I feel is the most important thing that we can discuss. And, I thought about it, and I thought, well, we're probably going to discuss that during this episode, and I'd like to just read something that I wrote that extended my thinking about this disability of love. After Keith asked me to be a guest on his podcast, I again considered the disability of love, and I wrote these thoughts. “The Russian writer Dostoyevsky once said, in every human being there is a divine spark. Over the years, I've considered the implications of this quote. If we all have the same divine spark in us Christians, Jews, Hindus, Muslims, agnostics, then divinity would be the most meaningful self-identity for everyone, including people with a disability. Imagine living in a world where the first thing you experience when you see someone in a wheelchair is their divinity, that would be empowering? Imagine nondualism as a globally accepted perspective with no separations between an individual and the world at large. This would create a profound shift in how we relate to each other. The nature of dualism is equality consciousness, which would foster a love and honoring of the divine and everyone who would want to discriminate against the divine. Unfortunately, for more than 2000 years, humans have lived with dualism, excuse me, as their most commonly shared reality. Consequently, we feel separate from everything that is outside ourself. Fears and antagonisms often develop toward people who look different, act different, or have different beliefs. They become other, which makes them prime targets for discrimination. People with disabilities are often experienced as other. You may be thinking, yes. In a perfect world, nondualism would be a beautiful way to live. But is there any evidence that nondualism is a science based reality? There is compelling evidence. Excuse me. There is compelling evidence. For decades, quantum physics has revealed that the animating creative energy of the universe animates each of us equally in us, as us. Tragically, this reality is widely ignored. Nondualism certainly isn't taught in our schools, where the perspective of most teachers is that of Descartes. I think, therefore I am. With all due respect to Descartes, there is considerably more to our existence in infinite space than our mind. Spread the word. We are all divine. May nondualism become the experience we all share on our sacred planet. I can't hear you now. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Wow that's very profound, I was muted. But then again, I wouldn't expect anything less from knowing you the way I do. You had actually pitched the book to me and the title. The title that I came up with was, Letter to an Unknown Lover, because I am a spoiler alert, a hopeless romantic, or at least I was then. But the book never got written or off the ground, save that sermon. Which I later redid by co opting the title, but at that time, I didn't know jack about interviewing people, at all, and it's funny how the passage of years illuminates certain things to people, because originally the importance of this podcast, and I talked about this in Season 1, was originally me doing the interviews. No one would see them or hear them, and then I would write them up as a blog, but then I remembered very aptly and correctly that disability advocates don't like their stories being told by anyone but themselves. And so I changed the entire approach. But had you or anyone else predicted this as a job to me in 2017 or 2018, I would've laughed and said, hey man, you, you’ve got the wrong guy. That’s nowhere in my wheelhouse. I don't want to do that. I like people, but interviewing them for long periods, doing research, and then recording them, I mean, I've gotten very comfortable with my voice over the years. It's been a real struggle, as you well know, because I moaned about it a lot, in terms of social and even interpersonal dynamics, but before 2019, just as the world was about to change, very unexpectedly, is when this concept was born, but it took several years to get off the ground. And so, going back to, 2007, 2008, when the disability of love concept was pitched, I'm really glad that the idea went nowhere at that time, and we had tried to resume it several years later, but that didn't work because I wasn't ready and talking to people about the most intimate parts of their lives was and frankly still is, is really scary and uncomfortable to me, because I'm a curious cat, like yourself, but I don't like to pry, I don't like to feel that I have a right to force intimacy onto people with disabilities or anyone, but especially people with disabilities because sometimes, often times, people without disabilities think they are entitled to know everything about a person with disabilities lives just because they're curious. And so, and I've been reminded of that again and again and again over the years. So, different book-marked into a different form, more accessible and there were several years where I even forgot about the concept because besides a 2015 sermon I did in Arizona, it just seemed like an insurmountable mountain, and I just didn't want to, I didn't want to do it because I didn't know how. And so that’s forward roughly 10 years, 10 or 11 in the concept, was introduced to this concept. So I'm very thankful that the universe kept poking at it and wouldn't entirely let it be forgotten by me and you, it seems. So, we could talk forever about the stories of your life, the stories and moments that we had at the college, and rightfully so, we had only worked together for about three or four years. But the college ran into financial trouble and as we're winding down this episode, talk about that experience. And what it was like going through it, not just as a sensitive person, but also a mentor who is seeing a radical shift in every direction where you worked, that really didn't need to be there or happen in the first place, had certain things aligned, but they didn't. And so, as a protector, as a mentor, what was that experience like for you? Scott Seldin: Well, the students that I worked with in my office, we're really freaked out about it and everyone who worked at the college was also freaked out. So it wasn't as if I was some placid person sitting back and let me, let's talk about how you feel. It was, let's talk about how we feel because I'm feeling everything that you're feeling. And we were given the news that the college was 35 million in debt and that it could, it might very well have to close. When I first was hired at the College of Santa Fe, one of the staff members in my department referred to the college as a funky little place, it was really a creative place. You know, it was for the arts and so people were playing music and people were writing and there was all this expression, creative expression. And then all of a sudden it was like, well, you know, and the president resigned and disappeared from what happened to him. And so, I tried to contribute what I could. Certainly with working with students, but I was very upfront about, I'm feeling what you're feeling. Okay. I would drive a shuttle van filled with students down to the Capitol to lobby for some sanity, and we did that for weeks. But it was, you know, sometimes people are given you and it's like having an opportunity to speak and the opportunity itself, is somehow a confirmation of all voices being included. But it really was just, I don't think we were taken seriously. I don't. Ultimately, the students were creative. They had imagination. I found the staff to be really great. They had imagination, but I can't say I found that imagination to be prevalent in the administration, because they were the ones without the imagination to figure out how such a jewel of a place as the College of Santa Fe. You know, they could have really done something to publicize it, but it required imagination. And yeah, that's how it felt. It was a very rough time. And then when they announced that the college was going to close, well, students had to know where they were going to get credit and they felt abandoned, largely abandoned. I would think, and not just think, but that's what I heard from students. Yeah. So it was a very rough thing. It was talked about out of the blue. That was an out of the blue story. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Yes, it very much was. It happened in 2009 and the college was eventually reformed into a university as a public private partnership between the city of Santa Fe and Laureate that ran the Santa Fe University of Art in Design as it would be known for the remainder of the time. It was in existence. It would become a completely different entity in every way from the college in which it was founded with the values of the Christian Brotherhood. And this is an interesting topic, and this is also an interesting episode because it's really a two parter. My next guest, a disabled filmmaker, Rio Finnegan, actually came to the university to study in their film program, which was and is incredible. One of the best in the country, if not the entire world and he was there, when the university finally closed. But Scott, our journey with the college ended roughly around the same time. I believe I left a few months earlier due to reasons I won't get in on the podcast. And so, as we wrap up, and I ask the final questions, what did you do after the College of Santa Fe, and how did you reinvent or rediscover yourself and find that sanity? Scott Seldin: Well, we can only hope for partial sanity. Well, you know, there ain’t no cure for the summertime blues. Well I worked basically as an entrepreneur, as a personal development coach and I worked with a number of students, well, they were not necessarily students, but they weren't students at the time. I worked with people with disabilities, and I wrote a book, Mentoring Human Potential, which included a number of stories about, you know, The College of Santa Fe. My current memoir also includes some stories from the College of Santa Fe. And I was, you couldn't help but be changed by the experience because you don't expect the college where you're working to close. It's just, it's highly unusual. And prior to working at the College of Santa Fe, I ran a school on the Adolescent Psychiatric Unit of St. Vincent Hospital and that also closed. So I had two jobs that I really loved and that really called forth what I had to give. And, I was very happy with them. So having both really good jobs close, it's a punch to the gut you know, and so I did a number of things, you know, writing, certainly, and working with people, photography, you know, this is an ideal, Santa Fe is ideal for artists, but it's a tough, it's a tough place. You know, but, you know, that's basically what I've been doing. And currently I'm seeking people who want to write their memoirs. My thinking is they don't have to have, you know, I feel we all have disabilities that let's say that up front. So it's, but that's a whole other discussion. But for people who have disabilities, you have, I think the people I've worked with have had incredible stories. They're really incredible stories and they're largely untold stories because there's a lot of suffering that I think is part of having it, having disabilities where you are different in one way or another from the mainstream. It can be very, very painful. So what you were referring to earlier in the conversation about, you know, as an interviewer, you don't want to feel that you're prying into those stories. My feeling is, I don't want to, I would feel the same way and I do feel the same way, but I feel that the stories are very important and they're important for people who think that they don't have disabilities. They just have problems, as we all do, we all have problems. But I think that writing your stories and I feel this way about you as well, that you're a very sensitive person, you articulate and it takes courage to do what you're doing and you're providing a great service through this podcast and I was thinking disabilities, Disability Empowerment Now, and what we've been discussing, I think contribute to empowerment. People with disabilities who want to write their stories, but are intimidated or feel they don't want to reveal too much about themselves, I certainly respect that, but I can tell you from my own experience that writing my book with my stories was therapeutic. When I talked about the dog burning incident, writing about it. It's not that you just write it once. You're in a sense, expiating the trauma, you're expiating the experience, the negative that is slow to leave. So writing, I found to be therapeutic and history repeats itself. So, protest, I think is very valuable, very important, but you have to understand the structure of the society we live in. And, you know, after I had the dog burning and all of that, I wound up being arrested on a totally bullshit charge, but a serious charge. And it's about, you know, how do you reclaim your name. Do that. So, you reclaim your name by writing a book, and have the transcript that shows that the judge and I remember this moment where the judge realized he realized that I was telling the truth. And, he basically told the district attorney, if you charge this man with such serious crimes and not put forth any evidence, do not show any evidence. And then they tried to get me to agree to plead guilty to a misdemeanor. This was the sale and possession of marijuana, which at that time was very serious. You could be put away for years. And I refused to plead guilty to anything. And my lawyer went back into conference with the DA and came out and he said they're willing to reduce the charges. These serious charges, I had lost, not lost a year of my life, but it was almost a year before it went, if I hadn't agreed to their last offer, which was to reduce the charges to disorderly conduct. I would've gone to trial and even without evidence, I could have been found guilty. And so I had to make a decision whether to plead guilty to disorderly conduct. I thought about disorderly conduct, what does this have to do with being thrown in jail? On a drug charge. Anyway, I did, I plead guilty while maintaining my innocence, and it was at that moment that the judge realized. This man is telling the truth. So I hope that anyone reading that will think about their own name and their sensitivity, the sensitivity to what you're referring to about whether you really want to reveal something, you know, it's a very personal decision. But I think you handled it so well. I really do. And my hat's off for what you've created here. It's fantastic. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Thank you, my friend. And we will certainly do more episodes together, of course, if we don't stop talking, this will easily be a five to ten hour episode. But in wrapping up, and who would listen to that. In wrapping up, we've certainly told a lot of stories and some we are just beginning to tell. As my guest, what do you hope that people with disabilities take away from this episode? And what do you hope that people who have yet to discover their own disabilities take away from this episode? Scott Seldin: Well let's see. What I hope people will take away from it is that I hope that, and I say this in my book on the back cover, if you were to select and write your most memorable life shaping stories from birth to present, what would they be? Here are my stories. And I go on to basically say that I hope that my book will inspire people to write their own stories. And I hope that for anyone viewing this episode, who would like to write their own memoir, this is work that I'm currently doing and they can reach me at my website, the book's website, but includes the memoir, my work as a memoir writing coach. So if they go to outofthebluestories.com, and just click on the link, your memoir, that's something that I would hope that people would at least investigate, consider the possibility that writing a memoir, their memoir, can be very, very helpful, not only to them. But to anyone who reads it, a self-published memoir. But I think that empowerment. This is about empowerment. Your show is about empowerment and in writing your stories. You know, there are stories that I totally respect you're not writing, but they would be quite illuminating if you did. So, I think that there are a lot of people who may be viewing this who feel the same way. They'd like to be able to express themselves. They'd like to become more dimensionally visible. And writing your stories I think allows that and allows that to happen. So there are a lot of benefits. So that's what I'd like people to take away. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Well, my friend, it has certainly been a very illuminating episode. It's always such a joy to talk to you. I can't believe we've known each other for almost 20 years now, and it's been over ten years since we've actually existed in the same physical space. I look forward to bringing you back next season and talking more with you about the work you do, mentoring people with disabilities and other people as well. And I'm sure we will have many more stories to tell in the future. My best regards to you and your family. Scott Seldin: Thank you and my best regards to you and your family. Thanks for having me on. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Thank you. You have been listening to Disability Empowerment Now. I would like to thank my guest, You, our listener and the Disability Empowerment Team that made this episode possible. More information about the podcast can be found at DisabilityEmpowermentNow.com or on social media @disabilityempowermentnow. The podcast is available wherever you listen to podcasts or on the official website. Don’t forget to rate, comment, and share the podcast! This episode of Disability Empowerment Now is copyrighted 2023. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Bienvenidos a Disability Empowerment Now, temporada tres. Hoy estoy hablando con un muy querido amigo mío y ex mentor, Scott Seldin, a quien conocí en el entonces College of Santa Fe en Santa Fe, Nuevo México. Es mentor, coach de vida, fotógrafo, autor y asesora periódicamente a personas con discapacidad. Scott, bienvenido al podcast. Scott Seldin: Gracias por invitarme a tu podcast. Es una contribución increíble la que estás haciendo, así que quiero honrarla desde el principio. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Muchas gracias. Estamos aquí hoy para hablar sobre el College of Santa Fe, cómo nos conocimos y tu nueva autobiografía. La cual se llama My Out of the Blue Stories: One Man Journey through Life. Subiremos la imagen de forma más clara en el sitio web y en la promoción. Lo terminé de leer la otra noche y, como te estaba diciendo, en el preámbulo antes de comenzar a grabar, no esperaba que el formato del libro, unas 60 historias cortas, fuera realmente tan intrigante y realmente pensé que te conocía bien, en algún punto, pero al leer tu libro, me iluminó mucho más, y entonces tu libro y el formato que elegiste son excelentes. Scott Seldin: Bueno, gracias. Y el formato surgió de forma bastante natural porque mi enfoque fue comenzar con mis primeros recuerdos y repasar cada año y tratar de recordar cualquier historia de ese período, podría ser de cuando tenía dos años, cuatro años, seis años, cualquier historia que se haya quedado conmigo y todavía tenga significado para mí. Y eso podría tener significado para otras personas. Así es como surgió el formato, ya sabes, algunas de las historias tienen quizás cinco o seis oraciones, de las primeras. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: También descubrí que Scott es tu apellido y no tu primer nombre, y que también naciste prematuro. Scott Seldin: Bueno, no, no, no nací prematuramente. ¿Esa introducción de estar en el útero? Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí. Scott Seldin: Déjame ver si puedo encontrarlo aquí. Sabes, empecé sin ningún recuerdo de estar en el útero, pero algo sucedió durante ese tiempo. Y para los oyentes, es una historia tan breve que simplemente podría leerla. “Aunque no recuerdo haber estado en el útero, imagino que está oscuro y que estoy viviendo en un saco de amor amniótico. Mi mundo eterno es dulce y seguro. Lo exploro suavemente con mis piernas y manos, reconfortado por sonidos ahogados. De repente, el mundo en el que he estado viviendo durante siete meses y medio desaparece cuando a mi madre le dicen que su padre ha muerto. Estoy inmerso en su dolor. Y el tiempo comienza para mí”. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, puedo ver la confusión por la suposición a la que salté, gracias por explicarlo. Scott Seldin: Sí claro. Mi mamá era un ser humano exquisitamente amoroso. Entonces, estar en el saco amniótico antes del nacimiento, imagino que debe haber sido una bendición para cualquier ser en esa situación. Y luego, cuando escucha eso, le dicen, y no sabe que su padre está enfermo y se está muriendo cuando le dicen eso, el dolor es abrumador. Y en mi imaginación, creo que eso debe haber cambiado totalmente mi mundo. Y tuvo un impacto de manera sutil y tal vez no tan sutil a lo largo de mi vida en términos de los extremos, los extremos del amor y la dicha y los extremos de experimentar dolor y tener empatía y compasión por las personas porque cuando sientes lo que alguien más te está sintiendo. Me recuerda a una letra de una canción de Bob Marley, una letra de una canción donde canta, "sólo el que lo siente lo sabe". Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, eso es muy, muy cierto. He estado pensando mucho en ti y en cómo nos conocimos en la universidad. Debe haber sido el otoño de 2017. Perdón, del 2007. Sí, gran diferencia y probablemente fuiste una de las primeras personas que conocí en Trío. Lo cual era el centro de recursos para discapacitados de la universidad, tal como estaba, aparte de eso. Scott Seldin: Bueno, trabajamos con personas con discapacidades y también trabajamos con estudiantes de primera generación y también con personas que tuvieron dificultades financieras al crecer y con familias. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí. Sí. Quiero decir, obviamente nos convertimos rápidamente en amigos cercanos y profesionales a lo largo de los años, pero estoy tratando de recordar algunas de las primeras impresiones que tuve de ti, y te lo dije antes, que el tiempo parece haber pasado varias vidas, para ser honesto. Es muy curioso cómo el tiempo reordena las cosas, ciertos recuerdos. Mencionaste que tenías un recuerdo claro de mi apartamento en Nueva York, y yo tengo un recuerdo muy claro de tu oficina en la universidad. Pero no entiendo lo que se dijo, cómo fue que nos presentaron. Scott Seldin: Yo lo recuerdo, entraste a mi oficina con tus padres y nos sentamos, ya sabes, hablamos, nos presentamos. Y mi impresión de tus padres fue que eran personas muy comprensivas y cariñosas y que habían venido contigo para facilitar esta introducción a mí y a nuestro departamento, y lo que realmente me gustó de la forma en la que se desarrolló fue que no estaban controlando nuestro tiempo juntos. Te permitieron espacio para que emergieras como eres y realmente lo aprecié y habló muy bien de ellos dos. Y rápidamente nos convertimos en amigos. Había algo que entendíamos entre nosotros. Al menos esta fue mi impresión, mi memoria sensorial, de que entendíamos algo entre los dos que, ya sabes, hay algunas personas con las que realmente te conectas. Y simplemente tienes una idea de quiénes son y de que es un espacio seguro, ya sabes, y así es como recuerdo nuestro encuentro. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, durante los tres o cuatro años, creo que en realidad fueron tres y medio. Nos volvimos bastante cercanos porque compartíamos una filosofía parecida en nuestra vida y se expandió a medida que yo intentaba navegar por la escena universitaria y estar inmerso en el pueblo de Santa Fe, o la ciudad, perdón, la ciudad de Santa Fe, y lo que yo he aprendido a través de tu autobiografía es que este tipo de tutoría no es nada nuevo para ti. Lo has hecho de una forma u otra década tras década. Y quiero decir, hay tantas historias en este libro que vale la pena mencionar y de la que me encanta hablar, y eso es incluso antes de que lleguemos a la sección sobre Santa Fe y donde me mencionas, y luego mencionas a Daniel, y luego sigues. Me encanta como termina. Y vuelve al pasado, tiene ese comienzo cuando tú mismo estabas en la universidad y ya habías recorrido este camino antes, esa es la frase final del libro y de la autobiografía y yo digo: Sé exactamente lo que quiere decir con eso. Es como si los títulos de los capítulos fueran tan apropiados. Sé más sobre tu familia a través de este libro que cuando entrenamos, cuando entrenamos juntos como mentor y aprendiz. Eres una de las personas más solitarias que he conocido, y eso no es nada malo. Se trata simplemente de quién eres y cómo te desarrollaste. Al leer tu libro, puedo ver exactamente por qué, o algunas de las razones por las que te has desarrollado de la forma en que lo has hecho. Scott Seldin: Bueno, para decirlo en una frase. Está difícil ahí fuera. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, efectivamente. Scott Seldin: Realmente lo es y, para protegerse, es tan fácil perder lo que crees que es mejor en ti mismo cuando intentas encajar en una cultura que es altamente competitiva. Y, frecuentemente, desdeña a aquellos que se perciben de alguna manera como inferiores a lo que uno podría pensar de sí mismo o en qué lugar cree que se encuentra en la maldita jerarquía de estatus. Ya sabes, tengo un buen recuerdo de mi primer año en la universidad y de lo solo que me sentí. Y no sabía en quién podía confiar. No sabía quién estaba ahí para ayudarme. Realmente había muy poca gente en ese momento. No recuerdo haber acudido a ningún mentor, entrenador ni a nadie. Y aprendes lo que no sabes. Y es duro, es duro. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, una cosa que realmente aprecié y amé inmensamente de tu libro es que, de tu autobiografía, es que las historias eran muy diversas. Incluso las historias que sucedieron en el mismo lugar. No estabas pisando el mismo terreno. No te estabas repitiendo. Los personajes cobraron vida, lo único que hubiera hecho aún más amena la experiencia de lectura es si hubieras hecho una versión en audiolibro, porque, discúlpame. Lo siento, se me olvidó que había una línea telefónica activa detrás de mí, así que tuve que apagara. Como decía, las historias eran tan personales y evocadoras que incluso sin una versión en audiolibro, me deleito con los audiolibros todo el tiempo. Quiero decir, es irreal. Pude apreciar la cantidad de detalles que pusiste en cada escena. Y me hizo sentir como si estuviera en vivo, y allí contigo. Desde tu infancia hasta este momento. Y así es como funciona el libro y es efectivo cuando el lector puede imaginar que realmente estuvo allí, en cada habitación, en cada escena contigo. Y entonces, tu libro es increíble. Scott Seldin: Gracias. Gracias. Eso es realmente lo que esperaba que fuera, el efecto que tendría en el lector el hecho de que lo atrajeran. Se cuenta desde la perspectiva de primera persona. Esto está sucediendo ahora. Y traté de no poner nada que no perteneciera a la historia. Así que creo que tiene sobra y plenitud simultáneamente. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, definitivamente lo tiene. Entonces, ¿qué te motivó a escribir este libro? Quiero decir, sé que hablas un poco de ello en el período inicial, pero cuentanos más sobre por qué ahora. Scott Seldin: ¿Por qué ahora? Bueno, creo que doy cuatro razones por las que escribí el libro y definitivamente para que mis amigos me conozcan mejor, para conocerme mejor a mí mismo. Hay cosas diferentes. Dos, ya sabes, tengo un extracto de una carta que recibí de mi abuelo, y llegué a conocerlo y a mi papá sólo por leer su carta sobre su vida, pero había una causa, profunda y quizás más motivadora, el motivo para escribir el libro y yo estaba en la década de 1960 con la guerra de Vietnam que empezó cuando estaba en la universidad y yo era un activista, un manifestante contra la guerra, y creé algunas manifestaciones. Fue, ya sabes, ver una guerra horrible y sin sentido en la que Estados Unidos estaba participando, en Vietnam, donde no conocíamos la cultura, no conocíamos a la gente. Era una guerra civil y entramos en ella con estudiantes y mucha gente mayor. Estar en la universidad, en cierto modo, se hizo cargo porque, por un par de razones, una fue que, como ser humano, experimentar tu propio país, el país que amas, cometiendo tal horror en una tierra extranjera con gente, ¿no? no los conocemos así. Entonces pasó todo eso. Y la otra razón y una de las fuerzas motivadoras para muchos estudiantes fue que había un reclutamiento y nosotros mismos fácilmente podríamos terminar en Vietnam. Así que había dos razones por las que los estudiantes eran tan activos y era un momento tan angustioso para ser estudiante, pero también era un momento muy vivo para ser estudiante porque esto era vida o muerte y queríamos poner fin a esa guerra y pensamos que una vez que la gente entendiera lo que realmente estaba pasando, que la guerra terminaría y que ese era nuestro objetivo terminar la guerra, pero se volvió muy frustrante porque podría haber 200.000 personas en Central Park, más protestando contra la guerra. Lyndon Johnson era el presidente y, básicamente, se convirtieron en un gran número de personas que protestaron y no vimos ningún cambio. Entonces yo estaba en la universidad de posgrado en Long Island y vivía en una casa con un par de chicos que estaban en la universidad de posgrado, creo. Y tuve una idea para una manifestación y antes de eso, déjame decir antes de eso, me arrestaron en una manifestación en la ciudad de Nueva York y me quitaron los cargos, pero luego, unos meses después, se me ocurrió una idea para cambiar la forma de pensar de la gente, la mentalidad sobre la guerra para que se entiendan mejor a sí mismos de alguna manera. Entonces, la idea era básicamente, bueno, lo que sucedió fue, y esta es la motivación y la motivación subyacente, porque terminé siendo incriminado por un cargo de drogas e hice algo que la manifestación llegó hasta la línea, de que lo que hice no fue nada ilegal. No fue violento, pero sí provocó un cambio de mentalidad. Mi intención era que si la gente pudiera abrir la puerta a sus propias respuestas condicionadas, eso ayudaría. Y entonces se me ocurrió la idea. Llamé a un periódico de Long Island. Dije que inventé un nombre para un grupo de estudiantes, Estudiantes contra la Guerra, los llamé y les dije que íbamos a quemar un perro con napalm, que se estaba usando en Vietnam. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Cualquier activista por los derechos de los animales que esté escuchando esto, y espero que no les importe que les diga, ningún perro o animal fue lastimado jamás. Scott Seldin: Y soy un amante de los animales tan devoto como jamás podrás encontrar. Durante 20 años he estado ofreciendo col rizada a los conejos salvajes, ya sabes, les canto a los pájaros. Eso es lo que soy. Entonces dije que iba a quemar al perro sin ninguna intención de hacerlo. Estoy quemando un perro con napalm, imprimió el periódico. Habían recibido una llamada y había indignación. La ASPCA recibió llamadas, no den perros a ningún hippie que viene a buscar un perro porque van a quemarlo en el asta de la bandera al mediodía en tal fecha. Entonces puse una mesa en la cafetería de los estudiantes universitarios contra la quema de perros y recogí firmas y la gente se indignó porque iban a quemar un perro con napalm. Entré a la ciudad de Nueva York con una mochila y fui a la liga de resistentes a la guerra, conseguí muchos folletos y cosas así y regresé. El día de la supuesta quema de perros, encabecé una marcha por el campus hasta el mástil de la bandera para protestar contra la quema de perros. Y le pregunté a una mujer que conocía que era una excelente oradora. Había rentado un megáfono y le pedí que hablara y había una gran multitud de personas reunidas en el mástil de la bandera y la marcha por el campus se unió a ese gran grupo. Y había preparado panfletos con mis compañeros de cuarto y lo abrí y las mujeres empezaron a hablar. Y para dar un discurso y la gente a la que repartimos estos panfletos e información sobre la guerra y lo abrieron y decían, gracias por su protesta contra la quema de un perro inocente con napalm. Ahora, por favor, presten su atención a la quema de personas inocentes con este mismo napalm en Vietnam. Y era una mente, ya sabes, muchos estudiantes que nunca habían ido a una protesta contra la guerra estaban allí para proteger a su perro. Y espero que haya tenido ese tipo de impacto y despertar. Pero sospecho que había gente, había gente con traje y corbata en esta reunión, y pensé, bueno, ya sabes, esto es un poco extraño. De todos modos, terminé siendo acusado de un cargo de drogas. Fue una gran redada de drogas en Long Island. E incriminaron a varios políticos, personas que participaron en manifestaciones. Y ante esta manifestación, la reacción fue fuerte. Y creo que desde su punto de vista, sintieron que yo había cruzado la línea con esta manifestación, aunque no era ilegal, era inusual. Y entonces terminé siendo incriminado. Entonces, ¿por qué escribí este libro? Cuando te incriminan por un cargo de drogas, cuando no hay nada de cierto en ello, y la gente piensa que eres un traficante de drogas, es tu apellido el que tiene una mancha, y es muy, muy doloroso. Entonces llevé ese trauma conmigo. Al final me negué a declararme culpable de nada porque no había hecho nada. Pasé unos días, unos días en la cárcel y ¿sigues ahí? Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, aquí sigo. Scott Seldin: Entonces estuve unos días en la cárcel, pero fue el trauma de que me vieran como alguien, por hacer algo y en ese momento era por media onza de marihuana, por venderla. Nunca hice eso, pero me incriminan a mí y a algunos otros. Entonces esa es una razón subyacente que no incluí en el libro, pero la estoy compartiendo con ustedes ahora, para escribir el libro porque tenía la transcripción donde se me encontró inocente y no tuve que ir a juicio porque redujo estos cargos a alteración del orden público. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, ese fue el capítulo más largo del libro, o la historia más larga debido a esa transcripción en la que tu apellido estaba escrito incorrectamente. Scott Seldin: Si, exacto. Exactamente. Esa es una respuesta larga a tu pregunta sobre por qué lo escribí. Y ahora voy a trabajar con personas que están escribiendo sus autobiografías. Encontré que esto era muy terapéutico, muy, muy terapéutico porque lo llevaba conmigo. Escribir esa historia eliminó gran parte de ese trauma y de esa gente. Si estoy trabajando con alguien que está escribiendo unas memorias, esa es parte de la razón para escribir las historias de tu vida. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Muy bien dicho. Así que vayamos a la universidad y a la sección que se nos ocurrió, pero que tú realmente encabezaste en mi mente y la leeré palabra por palabra de tu libro, porque solo tiene como cinco párrafos, pero eso es todo, son cinco párrafos. Así de conciso eres como escritor. 2011, esta es la página 149 del libro. Es el año 2011. Probablemente en realidad sucedió en 2008, pero hay una razón por la que lo pones en 2011 que quedará clara: la discapacidad y la capacidad de amar. “Durante los años que estuve en el College of Santa Fe, entrené a muchos estudiantes a quienes se les había diagnosticado discapacidades. Esta historia es sobre alguien llamado Daniel. Pero antes de presentárselo, compartiré algunos párrafos relevantes de un libro que escribí, Mentoring Human Potential, publicado en 2011 por iUniverse. Entre comillas, “entra en el mundo de tus aprendices a medida que te adentras más profundamente en tu propio mundo. Es tu limitada capacidad de amar convirtiendo a aquellos con discapacidades documentadas en otros.” Keith Murfee, nombre usado con permiso, es un estudiante del que fui mentor y que tiene parálisis cerebral. Ejerzo un extracto que escribió Keith y que dio en su iglesia en Washington, DC. “Tener una discapacidad es un desafío, pero no debería llevar a una vida deprimida; sin embargo, suele suceder debido a la mentalidad que tienen las personas sin discapacidad hacia las personas que las tienen. Un amigo y mentor, Scott Seldin, me sugirió que escribiera un artículo titulado The Disability of Love. Me intrigó el concepto. Todos tenemos una discapacidad, lo sepamos o no, la aceptemos o la rechacemos. Es la necesidad de amor. La falta de conciencia que ponemos sobre nuestra incapacidad de amar es la discapacidad que nos atormenta a todos. Es el terreno común de la vida”. Yo era un cachorro muy joven cuando escribí esas palabras. Yo acababa de salir de la secundaria. Me gusta usar metáforas y analogías, y aunque esas palabras todavía tienen algo de verdad, las he eliminado aún más años después. Pero, ¿qué hay de ese pasaje que te llamó la atención lo suficiente como para incluirlo no sólo en un libro que escribiste, Mentoring Human Potential, pero también en tu autobiografía? Scott Seldin: Bueno, la discapacidad del amor es como una plaga para la humanidad. Mientras hablamos, en el Medio Oriente se están produciendo muchas matanzas. Es una matanza indescriptible. Ni siquiera puedes, ya sabes, pero la discapacidad del amor. Lo vemos expresado cuando dije antes que es difícil ahí fuera. Es duro porque existe esta discapacidad del amor. Y yo, esto realmente expresa lo que creo que es lo más importante que podemos discutir. Y lo pensé y pensé, bueno, probablemente vamos a discutir eso durante este episodio, y me gustaría leer algo que escribí que amplió mi pensamiento sobre esta discapacidad del amor. Después de que Keith me pidió que fuera invitado a su podcast, volví a considerar la discapacidad del amor y escribí estos pensamientos. “El escritor ruso Dostoievski dijo una vez: en cada ser humano hay una chispa divina”. A lo largo de los años, he considerado las implicaciones de esta frase. Si todos tenemos la misma chispa divina en nosotros, cristianos, judíos, hindúes, musulmanes y agnósticos, entonces la divinidad sería la identidad propia más significativa para todos, incluidas las personas con discapacidad. Imagina vivir en un mundo donde lo primero que experimentas cuando ves a alguien en silla de ruedas es su divinidad, ¿eso sería empoderador? Imaginemos el no dualismo como una perspectiva globalmente aceptada sin separaciones entre un individuo y el mundo en general. Esto crearía un cambio profundo en la forma en que nos relacionamos unos con otros. La naturaleza del dualismo es la conciencia de igualdad, que fomentaría el amor y el honor de lo divino y de todos aquellos que quisieran discriminar contra lo divino. Desafortunadamente, durante más de 2000 años, los humanos hemos vivido con el dualismo, perdón, como su realidad más compartida. En consecuencia, nos sentimos separados de todo lo que está fuera de nosotros. A menudo se desarrollan miedos y antagonismos hacia personas que lucen diferentes, actúan diferente o tienen creencias diferentes. Se convierte en otro, lo que los convierte en objetivos principales de discriminación. Se suele considerar que las personas con discapacidad son “otros”. Quizás estés pensando, sí. En un mundo perfecto, el no dualismo sería una hermosa manera de vivir. Pero, ¿hay alguna evidencia de que el no dualismo sea una realidad basada en la ciencia? Hay pruebas convincentes. Disculpa. Hay pruebas convincentes. Durante décadas, la física cuántica ha revelado que la energía creativa animadora del universo nos anima a cada uno de nosotros por igual, en nosotros, como nosotros. Trágicamente, esta realidad es ampliamente ignorada. Claramente el no dualismo no se enseña en nuestras escuelas, donde la perspectiva de la mayoría de los profesores es la de Descartes. “Pienso, luego existo.” Con el debido respeto a Descartes, nuestra existencia en el espacio infinito implica mucho más que nuestra mente. Difundir la palabra. Todos somos divinos. Que el no dualismo se convierta en la experiencia que todos compartimos en nuestro planeta sagrado. No te escuco. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Vaya, eso es muy profundo, no tenía prendido mi micrófono. Pero claro, no esperaría menos, de conocerte tanto. De hecho, me presentaste el libro y el título. El título que se me ocurrió fue, Letter to an Unknown Lover, porque soy un spoiler alert, un romántico empedernido, o al menos lo era en ese entonces. Pero el libro nunca se escribió ni despegó, salvo ese sermón. Lo cual luego rehice al optar por el título, pero en ese momento, no sabía nada sobre cómo entrevistar a la gente, en absoluto, y es curioso cómo el paso de los años ilumina ciertas cosas a la gente, porque originalmente la importancia de este podcast, y hablé de esto en la temporada 1, originalmente era yo quien hacía las entrevistas. Nadie las veía ni las escuchaba, y luego las escribía en un blog, pero luego recordé muy acertada y correctamente que a los defensores de la discapacidad no les gusta que nadie más que ellos mismos cuenten sus historias. Y entonces cambié todo el enfoque. Pero si tú o alguien más hubiera predicho esto como un trabajo para mí en 2017 o 2018, me habría reído y dicho, oye hombre, tienes al tipo equivocado. Eso no está en ninguna parte de mi timonera. No quiero hacer eso. Me gusta la gente, pero entrevistarlas durante largos períodos, investigando y luego grabándolo, quiero decir, me he sentido muy cómodo con mi voz a lo largo de los años. Ha sido una verdadera lucha, como bien saben, porque me quejé mucho de ello, en términos de dinámica social e incluso interpersonal, pero antes del 2019, justo cuando el mundo estaba a punto de cambiar, de manera muy inesperada, es cuando nació este concepto, pero tardó varios años en despegar. Y entonces, volviendo a 2007, 2008, cuando se lanzó el concepto de discapacidad del amor, estoy muy contento de que la idea no llegó a ninguna parte en ese momento, y habíamos intentado retomarlo varios años después, pero no fue así porque no estaba preparado y hablar con la gente sobre las partes más íntimas de sus vidas era y, francamente, todavía lo es, me da mucho miedo e incomodidad, porque soy un gato curioso, como tú, pero no me gusta entrometerme, no me gusta sentir que tengo derecho a imponer intimidad a las personas con discapacidades o a cualquier persona, pero especialmente a las personas con discapacidades porque a veces, muchas veces, las personas sin discapacidades piensan que tienen derecho a saber todo sobre una persona con discapacidad, sólo porque tienen curiosidad. Y así es, y eso me lo han recordado una y otra vez a lo largo de los años. De una forma diferente, más accesible y hubo varios años en los que incluso me olvidé del concepto porque además de un sermón de 2015 que hice en Arizona, parecía una montaña insuperable, y simplemente no quería, pero no quería hacerlo porque no sabía cómo. Y así, aproximadamente 10 años después, 10 u 11 en el concepto, se introdujo este concepto. Así que estoy muy agradecido de que el universo siguiera hurgando en ello y, al parecer, no dejaría que tú y yo lo olvidáramos por completo. Entonces, podríamos hablar para siempre sobre las historias de tu vida, las historias y los momentos que tuvimos en la universidad, y con razón, solo habíamos trabajado juntos durante unos tres o cuatro años. Pero la universidad tuvo problemas financieros y, mientras terminamos este episodio, hablemos sobre esa experiencia. Y lo que fue pasar por esto, no sólo como una persona sensible, sino también como un mentor que está viendo un cambio radical en todas las direcciones en las que trabajas, que realmente no tenía por qué estar allí o suceder en primer lugar, había sido ciertas cosas se alinearon, pero no fue así. Y entonces, como protector, como mentor, ¿cómo fue esa experiencia para ti? Scott Seldin: Bueno, los estudiantes con los que trabajé en mi oficina estaban realmente asustados por eso y todos los que trabajaban en la universidad también estaban asustados. Así que no era como si yo fuera una persona plácida que se sentaba y me dejaba hablar de cómo te sientes. Fue como, hablemos de cómo nos sentimos porque yo siento todo lo que tú sientes. Y nos dieron la noticia de que la universidad tenía una deuda de 35 millones y que podría, muy bien, tener que cerrar. Cuando me contrataron por primera vez en el College of Santa Fe, uno de los miembros del personal de mi departamento se refirió a la universidad como un pequeño lugar original, era realmente un lugar creativo. Ya sabes, era para las artes y entonces la gente tocaba música y escribía y había toda esta expresión, expresión creativa. Y luego, de repente, fue como, bueno, ya sabes, y el presidente renunció y desapareció por lo que le pasó. Y entonces traté de aportar lo que pude. Definitivamente trabajar con estudiantes, pero fui muy sincero al decir que siento lo que tú sientes. Bueno. Manejaba una camioneta llena de estudiantes hasta la capital para presionar por algo de cordura, y lo hicimos durante semanas. Pero, ya sabes, a veces se te da la gente y es como tener la oportunidad de hablar y la oportunidad en sí es de alguna manera una confirmación de que todas las voces están incluidas. Pero realmente fue solo que no creo que nos tomaran en serio. No. Al final, los estudiantes fueron creativos. Tenían imaginación. El personal me pareció realmente fantástico. Tenían imaginación, pero no puedo decir que encontré que esa imaginación prevaleciera en la administración, porque eran ellos los que no tenían la imaginación para descubrir cómo funciona un lugar tan maravilloso como el College of Santa Fe. Sabes, realmente podrían haber hecho algo para publicitarlo, pero requería imaginación. Y sí, eso es lo que sentí. Fue una época muy difícil. Y luego, cuando anunciaron que la universidad iba a cerrar, bueno, los estudiantes tenían que saber dónde iban a obtener créditos y se sintieron abandonados, muy abandonados. Pensaría, y no sólo pensaría, pero eso es lo que escuché de los estudiantes. Sí. Entonces fue algo muy duro. Se habló de ello así de la nada. Esa fue una historia inesperada. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Sí, lo fue y mucho. Sucedió en 2009 y la facultad finalmente se transformó en una universidad como una asociación público-privada entre la ciudad de Santa Fe y Laureate, que dirigía la Universidad de Arte en Diseño de Santa Fe, como se la conocería por el resto del tiempo. Estaba en existencia. Se convertiría en una entidad completamente diferente en todos los sentidos de la universidad en la que se fundó con los valores de la Hermandad Cristiana. Y este es un tema interesante, y este también es un episodio interesante porque en realidad es de dos partes. Mi siguiente invitado, un cineasta discapacitado, Rio Finnegan, vino a la universidad para estudiar en su programa de cine, lo cual fue y sigue siendo increíble. Uno de los mejores del país, sino del mundo entero, y estuvo allí cuando al fin se cerró la universidad. Pero Scott, nuestro viaje con la universidad terminó aproximadamente al mismo tiempo. Creo que lo dejé unos meses antes por razones por las que no mencionaré en el podcast. Y así, mientras concluimos y hago las preguntas finales, ¿qué hiciste después del College of Santa Fe y cómo te reinventaste o redescubriste y encontraste esa cordura? Scott Seldin: Bueno, sólo podemos esperar una cordura parcial. Bueno, ya sabes, no existe cura para la tristeza del verano. Bueno, trabajé básicamente como emprendedor, como coach de desarrollo personal y trabajé con varios estudiantes, bueno, no necesariamente eran estudiantes, pero no lo eran en ese momento. Trabajé con personas con discapacidad y escribí un libro, Mentoring Human Potential, que incluía una serie de historias sobre, ya sabes, el College of Santa Fe. Mis memorias actuales también incluyen algunas historias del College of Santa Fe. Y yo estaba, no podías evitar que la experiencia te cambiara porque no esperas que cierre la universidad donde estás trabajando. Simplemente es muy inusual. Y antes de trabajar en el College of Santa Fe, dirigía una escuela en la Unidad Psiquiátrica de Adolescentes del Hospital St. Vincent y esa también cerró. Así que tenía dos trabajos que realmente amaba y que realmente exigían lo que tenía para dar. Y estaba muy feliz con ellos. Entonces, tener dos trabajos realmente buenos cerca, es un puñetazo en el estómago, ya sabes, así que hice varias cosas, ya sabes, escribir, definitivamente, y trabajar con gente, fotografía, ya sabes, este es un ideal, Santa Fe es un lugar ideal para artistas, pero es un lugar duro, es un lugar duro. Ya sabes, pero, ya sabes, eso es básicamente lo que he estado haciendo. Y actualmente estoy buscando personas que quieran escribir sus autobiografías. Mi opinión es que no tienen que tener, ya sabes, creo que todos tenemos discapacidades, digámoslo desde el principio. Así es, pero esa es otra discusión completamente diferente. Pero para las personas que tienen discapacidades, creo que las personas con las que he trabajado tienen historias increíbles. Son historias realmente increíbles y en gran medida son historias no contadas porque creo que hay mucho sufrimiento que es parte de tenerlo, tener discapacidades en las que eres diferente de una forma u otra de la corriente principal. Puede ser muy, muy doloroso. Entonces, a lo que te referías anteriormente en la conversación, ya sabes, como entrevistador, no quieres sentir que estás husmeando en esas historias. Mi sentimiento es, no quiero, sentiría lo mismo y siento lo mismo, pero siento que las historias son muy importantes y son importantes para las personas que piensan que no tienen discapacidades. Simplemente tienen problemas, como todos nosotros, todos tenemos problemas. Pero creo que escribir tus historias, y lo que siento por ti también, es que eres una persona muy sensible, te expresas y se necesita coraje para hacer lo que estás haciendo y estás brindando un gran servicio a través de este podcast. Y yo estaba pensando en discapacidades, Disability Empowerment Now, y creo que lo que hemos estado discutiendo contribuye al empoderamiento de las personas con discapacidad que quieren escribir sus historias, pero se sienten intimidadas o sienten que no quieren revelar demasiado sobre sí mismas, definitivamente lo respeto, pero puedo decirles por experiencia propia que escribir mi libro con mis historias fue terapéutico. Cuando hablé del incidente de la quema del perro, escribiendo todo eso. No es que lo escribas sólo una vez. En cierto sentido, estás expiando el trauma, estás expiando la experiencia, lo negativo que tarda en salir. Así que escribir me resulta terapéutico y la historia se repite. Entonces, la protesta, creo que es muy valiosa, muy importante, pero hay que entender la estructura de la sociedad en la que vivimos. Y, ya sabes, después de que quemaran al perro y todo eso, terminé siendo arrestado en un cargo totalmente de mierda, pero un cargo serio. Y se trata de, ya sabes, cómo reclamas tu nombre. Haz eso. Entonces, recuperas tu nombre escribiendo un libro y tienes la transcripción que muestra que el juez y yo recordamos ese momento en el que el juez se dio cuenta de que yo estaba diciendo la verdad. Y básicamente le dijo al fiscal de distrito: si acusa a este hombre de delitos tan graves y no presenta ninguna prueba, no presente ninguna prueba. Y luego intentaron que aceptara declararme culpable de un delito menor. Se trataba de la venta y tenencia de marihuana, que en aquella época era muy grave. Podrían encerrarte durante años. Y me negué a declararme culpable de nada. Y mi abogado volvió a reunirse con el fiscal del distrito y salió y dijo que están dispuestos a reducir los cargos. Había perdido estos cargos graves, no había perdido un año de mi vida, pero pasó casi un año antes de que desaparecieran, si no hubiera aceptado su última oferta, que era reducir los cargos a alteración del orden público. Habría ido al juicio e incluso sin pruebas me podrían haber declarado culpable. Y entonces tuve que tomar la decisión de declararme culpable de alteración del orden público. Pensé en la alteración del orden público, ¿qué tiene esto que ver con que te metan en la cárcel? Por un cargo de drogas. De todos modos lo hice, me declaré culpable manteniendo mi inocencia, y fue en ese momento que el juez se dio cuenta. Este hombre está diciendo la verdad. Así que espero que cualquiera que lea esto piense en su propio nombre y su sensibilidad, la sensibilidad a lo que te refieres sobre si realmente quieres revelar algo, ya sabes, es una decisión muy personal. Pero creo que lo manejaste muy bien. Realmente lo creo. Y me quito el sombrero por lo que has creado aquí. Es fantástico. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Gracias mi amigo. Y seguramente haremos más episodios juntos, por supuesto, si no dejamos de hablar, este será fácilmente un episodio de cinco a diez horas. Pero para concluir, claramente hemos contado muchas historias y algunas apenas estamos empezando a contarlas. Como invitado mío, ¿qué espera que las personas con discapacidad se lleven de este episodio? ¿Y qué espera que las personas que aún no han descubierto sus propias discapacidades se lleven de este episodio? Scott Seldin: Bien, veamos. Lo que espero que la gente se lleve es que espero que, y lo digo en la contraportada de mi libro, si tuvieras que seleccionar y escribir tus historias más memorables sobre la configuración de tu vida desde el nacimiento hasta el presente, ¿cuáles serían? Aquí están mis historias. Y básicamente digo que espero que mi libro inspire a la gente a escribir sus propias historias. Y espero que cualquiera que vea este episodio y desee escribir sus propias memorias, este es el trabajo que estoy haciendo actualmente y puedan comunicarse conmigo en mi sitio web, el sitio web del libro, pero incluye las memorias, mi trabajo como entrenador de redacción de memorias. Entonces, si van a outofthebluestories.com y simplemente hacen clic en el enlace, sus memorias, eso es algo que espero que la gente al menos investigue, considere la posibilidad de que escribir una memoria, su memoria, pueda ser muy, muy útil no sólo a ellos. Pero para cualquiera que lo lea, es una memoria autoeditada. Pero creo que ese empoderamiento. Se trata de empoderamiento. Su podcast trata del empoderamiento y la escritura de sus historias. Sabes, hay historias que respeto totalmente que no escribas, pero serían muy esclarecedoras si lo hicieras. Entonces, creo que hay muchas personas que pueden estar viendo esto y sienten lo mismo. Les gustaría poder expresarse. Les gustaría volverse más visibles dimensionalmente. Y creo que escribir tus historias permite que eso suceda. Entonces hay muchos beneficios. Eso es lo que me gustaría que la gente se llevara. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Bueno, amigo mío, sin duda ha sido un episodio muy esclarecedor. Siempre es un placer hablar contigo. No puedo creer que nos conozcamos desde hace casi 20 años, y han pasado más de diez años desde que existimos en el mismo espacio físico. Espero volver a traerte la próxima temporada y hablar más contigo sobre el trabajo que haces, asesorando a personas con discapacidades y también a otras personas. Y estoy seguro de que tendremos muchas más historias que contar en el futuro. Mis mejores deseos para ti y tu familia. Scott Seldin: Gracias y mis mejores deseos para ti y tu familia. Gracias por invitarme. Keith Murfee-DeConcini: Gracias a ti. Has estado escuchando Disability Empowerment Now. Me gustaría agradecer a mi invitado, a ti, a nuestro oyente y al Equipo de empoderamiento de las personas con discapacidades que hicieron posible este episodio. Puedes encontrar más información sobre el podcast en DisabilityEmpowermentNow.com o en las redes sociales @disabilityempowermentnow. El podcast está disponible dondequiera que escuches tus podcasts o en el sitio web oficial. ¡No olvides calificar, comentar y compartir el podcast! Este episodio de Disability Empowerment Now tiene derechos de autor, 2023.

Other Episodes

Episode 0

April 18, 2022 00:03:26
Episode Cover

Season 1 Trailer

The Disability Empowerment Now Podcast is launching at the end of April! Get to know your host, Keith Murfee-DeConcini, before the launch of the...

Listen

Episode 0

July 09, 2024 01:29:22
Episode Cover

Nicole D'Angelo on 'How to Dance in Ohio' and Authentic Representation

Nicole D’Angelo (they/she) is a music director, actor, and multi-instrumentalist in the NJ/NYC area. A recovering classical musician, they majored in piano and bass...

Listen

Episode 0

January 08, 2023 01:10:14
Episode Cover

S2 Episode 8 with Nicholas Viselli

Nicholas Viselli (Artistic Director) joined Theater Breaking Through Barriers in 1997 and is deeply humbled to continue the company’s legacy, started by his predecessor,...

Listen