S3 Episode 1 with Temple Grandin

September 10, 2023 01:03:43
S3 Episode 1 with Temple Grandin
Disability Empowerment Now
S3 Episode 1 with Temple Grandin

Sep 10 2023 | 01:03:43

/

Show Notes

Temple Grandin P.h.D is a renowned autism spokesperson, author and animal behaviorist and an academic. She is a designer of livestock handling facilities and a Professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University. Facilities she has designed are located in the United States, Canada, Europe, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, and other countries. 

Dr. Grandin talks to Keith about her books “Thinking in Pictures,” and “Visual Thinking.” She talks about the disability mindset and emphasizes learning life-skills like “shopping, how to save money and general work skills,” and how to get a good career with these skills. She also talks about her HBO movie and that experience. 

Find the Transcript here. 

Encuentre la transcripción aquí.

Watch on Youtube

Disability Empowerment Now is produced by Pascal Albright.

View Full Transcript

Episode Transcript

Keith: Welcome to Disability Empowerment Now, Season three. I’m your host, Keith Murfee-DeConcini. Today I'm talking with Temple Grandin, an autism spokesperson, author, academic, and animal behaviorist. Temple, welcome to the show. Temple: It's really good to be here today. Keith: Thank you very much. So for the few people listening who may not know who you are, can you introduce yourself and tell us, what set you on your professional path? Temple: Well, I am now a professor of animal science at Colorado State University, but I had no speech until age four. I had very severe autistic symptoms at age two and three, rocking, screaming tantrums. I was very lucky to get into a very good, early educational class with a really wonderful speech therapist. That was really important and I had a lot of good teachers that helped me and I want to give credit to my mother and the other good teachers who worked with me, getting me to do new things, and encouraging my ability in art. I had a wonderful third grade teacher, and when I was eight years old, I did not know how to read and my teacher was very concerned about this. So, my mother taught me to read at home with phonics and we got a fun book, the Wizard of Oz, a really fun book from my generation. And my mother taught me the sounds. I already knew from my ABC's song, which has about half the sounds and she'd read a page and then she'd stop in an interesting part and have me read more and more on sounding out my words. And I very quickly went from no reading to sixth grade level reading. I had a lot of problems in high school, bullied, teased. I ended up getting kicked out of a high school in ninth grade for throwing a book at a girl who was bullying me, but I had some other really good teachers. My science teacher got me interested in studying. I just wanna give credit to all the good teachers that I had. Keith: Thank you. In your memoir, Thinking In Pictures, you talk a lot about autism and medicine, chapter six, “Believer in Biochemistry” you were very forthcoming that you are on an antidepressant. Why do people with autism often require lower dosage for effective treatment? Temple: Well, there's a difference between using an antidepressant to treat anxiety, which was my problem, and to treat depression and the label has the doses for depression. But for anxiety, you often need much lower doses and a very common mistake is made and my parents have told this to me over and over again. My child or teenager did really well on a low dose. We doubled the dose and he could not sleep and got agitated. Now, I started taking this medication, in my early thirties. I had panic attacks that worsened all through my twenties, and got worse and worse. Colitis attacks that would not stop. And I had read an article back in the seventies in Psychology Today called the “Promise of Biological Psychiatry” and then I went over to the library using skills I'd been taught by my science teacher to look up medical articles. And I looked through the symptoms and I had like eight out of 10 of 'em, but I resisted the idea of taking medication. So I laid that article aside and then I had a very stressful eye surgery, and that really got me stressed out. So I pulled the article out and I started taking a low dose of an old-fashioned drug named imipramine. This is my book of Thinking In Pictures where I discussed this. Even though that information is 25 years old, it is still accurate. The medications have not changed. They're still using the same medications. Now, there's way too many medications given out to young children, and especially more medications with more severe side effects, such as the atypical antipsychotics. There's too much of that given out. But for teenagers and adults on the spectrum, there's a segment of them that has extremely high anxiety. Not everybody. Just a segment and I was one of those individuals with really, really high anxiety and it's biology. A brain scan showed that my fear center was bigger than normal and the medication really helped me. I've been on it now for 40 years and I plan to keep taking it. I have seen a low dose of Prozac help people and they got stable and I've also seen a disaster when they went off the medication. Really bad mess. Keith: So what would you say to someone with autism who struggles with the idea of being medicated? Temple: Well, I struggled with that some, and I discuss it in here because when I first found the article after I read the article in Psychology Today, I went over to the library and I found the articles. I laid them aside for two years. I did struggle some of the ideas of taking medication, but then I had to have a very scary eye surgery, plastic surgery, consciousness, needles and stuff coming down to my eye. And that got me really stressed out, really stressed out. And then I realized if I don't take the medication, I'm gonna really be in trouble. And the colitis was getting worse and worse and worse and worse. That's why I was eating yogurt and jello. And when I went on the medication, within a week or so, the colitis cleared up and, and that's why the chapter's called a “Believer in Biochemistry”. When medications work, it's often just one thing sometimes that works. And that's when I realized that the anxiety was biology. I want to emphasize not every autistic person has this severe anxiety, but I was one of those. And then after I went on the medication for a while, I got to thinking, well I guess this is how so-called normal people feel, but it was sort of being in a constant state of fear all the time. Constantly fearful of the littlest things. My heart would pound, I'd hear some noise in the middle of the night, wake up with my heart pounding, sometimes I had difficulty swallowing and it worked. And I know some other people where it's worked and I know some people that had bipolar and they might get on lithium or some other medicine, and it worked. All I can say is if you're stable, you're taking a low dose. The only side effect I have is I have to drink a lot of water. It's about the only side effect I have, and you could, I made the mistake too of going, oh, I could stop taking this. Then I found out that I could not, but I have seen people like they were stable on lithium. They went off the medication and then one of the problems is sometimes the brain gets in trouble when they go off the medication and it doesn't work as well when they go back on it. I don't even know if I'd be alive today if I hadn't gone on the medication. My health in my early thirties was so bad. I probably would've had to have surgery to have half my innards taken out. The colitis got so bad and the thing that was amazing is the colitis cleared up within two weeks after I went on the medication, and now I just have little tiny bits of colitis. Keith: Wow. So in your new book, which came out last year. Temple: Yeah, Visual Thinking. Keith: Visual Thinking. You talk a lot about the disability mindset, and in your opinion is it good or bad and what is your opinion on special education? Temple: Well, we need to look at ages. Let's start with three-year-olds. I was in a very good program at age three and I'm a very big believer in early education, and I know there's been a lot of controversy about different teaching methods. I'm gonna just say little three-year-olds that are not talking need about 20 hours a week with an effective teacher. And what I've observed is some teachers have the ability to work with these children and some don't. So this is what you should get for a program for little children working on speech. Another thing that was worked on with me is how to wait and take turns at games. They teach you to inhibit a response, and there was no emphasis on eye contact. That was not emphasized. It was speech, turn-taking, and then skills, hair brushing, putting your coat on using utensils. And then the fourth thing is the child should like going to therapy, you should be making progress. The child should like going to therapy. Now about a disability mindset, one of the big problems I'm seeing is I'm seeing fully verbal teenagers that are doing very well in school, but they're not learning life skills. They're not learning things that I learned in elementary school, shopping, ordering food in restaurants, bank accounts, laundry, learning how to save money, just basic life skills like that. You know, we need to be teaching those things. And then how about work skills? Sudden transitions are really bad for people on the autism spectrum, so we need to start teaching work skills young and that's different from academic skills. Maybe at age eleven, volunteer jobs, farmer's market, a nursing home where you're walking somebody else's dog, where somebody outside the family is the boss. And then as soon as they're legal, a job may be at the grocery store or some other job I wanna avoid. These are the jobs I wanna avoid. Rapid multitasking jobs, McDonald's takeout window. No. Another thing is I cannot remember long strings of verbal instruction. Any task that requires sequence, let me write it down in a pilot's checklist. That's kind of my external working memory. But the problem, I think some of the problem with a disability mindset in autism is they've changed the diagnosis. So autism's going from Einstein, no speech until age three. He'd be in an autism program today, to somebody who's much more severe and may have a whole lot of other medical issues. Epilepsy on top of autism or autism is not the only diagnosis, and originally for an autism diagnosis, you had to have speech delay. That's what I had. Then there was the Asperger's, socially awkward and no speech delay. Then in 2013, 10 years ago, all of that was merged together. I think that was a big mistake, because if a person is diagnosed with ADHD or dyslexia, that's much more narrow. Reading difficulties, tension difficulties. But now you have this autism spectrum that's so broad and you see, I'm a visual thinker, so I thought it was a big mistake combining all of those things together. Keith: So following up on what you just said, the spectrum has gotten incredibly broad. Temple: Yes, that's right. Keith: And, I know that before it was called autism, it was called Asperger’s. Is there any difference between the two disorders? Temple: Well, the difference was autism, originally, the child had to have speech delay. You had to have delayed speech to be called autism, where to be called Asperger's, no speech delay. Asperger's has no obvious speech delay, but then autistic symptoms. That was the main difference and then they merged them all together. So now you've got somebody like Einstein or somebody who's programming computers for a tech company with the same label as somebody that might even have other neurological difficulties on top of the autism. Keith: Thank you for clearing that up. So let's get more into your new book Visual Thinking. Temple: Yes right here. Well, in Visual Thinking, I talk about three different kinds of ways that people think, and they have different abilities. I'm an object visualizer. Everything I think about is a photographic picture. And if you watch the HBO movie, that shows exactly how I think, in pictures. Now, another kind of thinker is the visual spatial. This person thinks in patterns. I think in photo-like pictures, the visual spatial thinks in patterns. This is your mathematical mind. In chemistry, physics, computer programming, and then you have verbal thinkers. And a lot of educators are highly verbal thinkers. They think in words. Now I thought everybody thought in pictures until I was in my late thirties and that's when I learned that not everybody thinks in pictures. And a lot of people are mixtures. So let's look at kinds of jobs that some of these different thinkers might be good at. From my kind of mind, an object visualizer, it's gonna be art, photography, working with animals, mechanical devices, fixing cars. Art and mechanics kind of go together. Then you have the visual spatial, you mean mathematics, music, chemistry, higher math. And word thinkers, of course, are good with words. And oh, I'm very interested in helping people get into satisfying careers because one of the things that's made my life worthwhile and made interesting is having an interesting career. That's been extremely important to me, and I wanna help other individuals to get into interesting careers because when I was out working on equipment in the meat packing plants, I worked with a lot of skilled metal workers that were inventing, inventing equipment and some of had, had barely graduated from high school. And about 20% of the people I worked with today would either be autistic, dyslexic, or ADHD. Keith: So are all people with autism by default visual thinkers? Temple: No, no, no, no, no. No they are not. That was a mistake I made when I wrote Thinking In Pictures 26 years ago I made the mistake of thinking that everybody was a visual thinker, that's wrong. Only a portion of the people on the autism spectrum are visual thinkers. Then the other type of thinker is the mathematical thinker. They think in patterns. And then there are some autistic people that think in words. They often are good at foreign languages, they like facts, like sports statistics, historical things they love facts. But what tends to happen in autism is you're less likely to have a mixture of the different kinds of thinking, much, much less likely. A lot of so-called normal people are more likely to be a mixture. Where if it’s an autistic person, you might get an extreme object visualizer like me who's good at art mechanics, photography and animals. Or an extreme mathematician, physicist, computer programmer, music, chemistry. Or then you have a verbal thinker, they tend to be more extreme. Where so-called normal people, you tend to get a lot more mixtures of the different kinds of thinking. And this is discussed in my book, Visual Thinking and I've discussed how we get into good careers using these skills. I do a lot of talks to big corporations and I tell them that you need the skills of people with autism to do things like fix elevators, for example, from my kind of mind. Keith: So following up on what you just said, what work environment would be ideal for people with autism? Temple: Well, there can be some sensory issues. I'll talk about the things I do not wanna have them in. A rapid multitasking environment, this would be a bad job, a McDonald's takeout window. Good jobs, computer programmers, they can sit at their desk and do computer programming. I could sit and do my design drawings. In fact, right here are some of my drawings for livestock. I could do my drawings and the way I sold the jobs was to show people my drawings. That's how I sold jobs. I showed off my portfolio on trading jobs. There's a lot of things like that. And then there's some jobs where you have to, you know, there's a lot of people of my kind of mind that are good at skilled trades. But the thing that we have to avoid is long strings of verbal information. There was a very sad story where an autistic man was fired from two electrician apprenticeships because the boss would go yack, yack, yack, yack, yack, light fixture, yack, yack, yack, yack, dimmer switch. And the autistic person couldn't remember the things he was supposed to install that day. If they had taken two minutes to make a list, I call it a pilot's checklist, make a list with some bullet points of the things to install that day, they would've had the job. That's something that I would do. I would write down the electrical devices I had to install that day. And if the boss then said, I didn't have time for that, I'd go pilots need a checklist, I need one too. And I wanna let everybody know pilots are required to use a checklist for every single flight. Keith: So you open Visual Thinking by reflecting on the fact that a lot of shop classes and other trade classes have almost virtually disappeared from American schooling, although in Arizona where I am, they still teach some, but for the vast majority, the classes you took when you were in school aren't really favored anymore. Temple: Well, the problem is we're gonna need these skills. In my book, Visual Thinking, I discussed very severe problems with skill loss because we took skill trades out. The US no longer makes the state-of-the-art electronic chip making machine. We don't make that. It comes from Holland. We no longer make poultry processing equipment, pork processing equipment. A lot of specialized electrical stuff. And this goes back to taking skilled trades classes out. You see that and the kind of people who are good at these things are people like me. I was on a Zoom call recently with a high school class and I talked about the different kinds of thinkers, the visual thinkers like me and the mathematical thinkers and the word thinkers. And this girl came up to the computer, because they had to go to the computer to answer the questions, and she says, my guidance counselor told me not to take any vo-tech classes. Well, I'll tell you, these are gonna be the things where the jobs will not be replaced by computers. Somebody's got to fix elevators. Somebody's got to fix airplanes and trains and cars. These jobs will not get replaced by computers. Keith: Votech is vocational, correct? Temple: That's right. That's vocational. Now I wanna emphasize the difference between high end skilled trades like an electrician, plumber, a metal fabricator who can invent mechanical devices. This is to the people I worked with. They invented all kinds of mechanical devices. This is not laying floor tiles or putting up roofing materials. That's just work. I'm talking about the types of skilled trades that require real visual intelligence. Keith: So there's a big trend on social media sites like TikTok where people produce content like, if you do such and such you may be autistic. Do you think self-diagnosing is helpful or harmful? Temple: Well, there's a lot of older adults that when they discover their autistic, they often discover they're autistic when their children get diagnosed. In fact, I've got this book here, Different, Not Less and these are 18 people, older people diagnosed later in life describing their experiences, and they found that that gave them insight into problems with relationships. After all, an autism diagnosis is just a behavioral profile. There's no lab test or x-ray for diagnosing autism. And I had a lady come up to me at the Denver Airport one time and she said, my book Thinking In Pictures helped her understand her engineer husband, who was probably on the spectrum, and that it saved their marriage because then she understood that the way he thinks and feels is different. So I think that that can be very helpful. Most older people that get diagnosed later in life feel a sense of relief. That's a good thing. But the other thing I'm concerned about is teenagers and young adults, especially fully verbal ones, not learning any life skills. I've talked to parents and I say, has your 16 year old ever just gone into a store by themselves and bought something and talked to the store staff? No, that's a problem. Keith: So you mentioned the HBO movie at the beginning of the episode, and I just watched it last night and it is incredible. The last half hour had me in tears. It was just so moving. I want to know your thoughts and favorite parts from the movie and what was it like meeting Claire Danes, the actress that portrayed you? Temple: Well, I want to talk about some of the things I really liked and the things that were really accurate. The first thing is it showed how my visual thinking works. It showed exactly how my mind works. It also showed projects that I actually did, and that's another thing I really liked about it. And Claire Danes, she managed to become me. We gave her old, ancient, old tapes, old VHS tapes, oldest ones I could find and she played those over and over and over again. And she sort of became me. I remember listening to an interview on the radio in the car, and they were interviewing me and then Claire Danes would talk in the movie and I almost mixed them up. Keith: How was it like watching yourself in another body? Temple: Well, it was, I remember going to the, they had a private showing at the HBO office and I just was there with the HBO producers in a little theater they had, watching it. And it was like going into a really strange sixties and seventies time machine. That's what it felt like. Keith: And so how accurate was it beyond portraying your visual thinking? Temple: Well we had to change things to fit a two hour movie, but I really liked the fact that, you know, my main characters, my mother and at the ranch was shown really nicely. And Mr. Carlock got an honorary doctorate. He was Mr. Carlock, and they made him Dr. Carlock. And I go, yep, we'll let him have an honorary doctorate. He deserves it. Keith: Why do you think neurotypical people believe that people with autism are geniuses or savants and lack empathy? Why have those assumptions persisted over years and years? Temple: Well, now you've asked me too many questions and I've lost my train of thought. This is where I don't do well with long verbal thinking. On empathy, I have a lot of empathy for physical hardship. When I see wrecked houses and people looking at that, I'm going, oh, that's just horrible. I remember seeing wrecked apartment buildings with people standing in broken apartments. I feel a lot of empathy for that. And I've forgotten the other question. You see, this is where I have almost no working memory. Keith: So sorry about that. So why do you think that neurotypical people assume that people with autism are savants? Temple: Oh, okay. Most autistics are not savants. I want to make that very clear. And I am not a savant. And there's a number of autistic people that are extremely intelligent, but that's certainly not the entire spectrum. The other thing I wanna talk about is they're individuals that do not speak. And some of these individuals that do not speak can learn to type completely independently, and they describe sensory scrambling. They describe problems, would be able to control their movements, and we need to be teaching 'em to type. Now, one of the big problems with people with, remember I talked about working memory where I cannot remember long strings of verbal instruction. I need to have a checklist. Any task that has steps in it, needs a checklist. And so for the person that I'm learning to type, it's not gonna work on this desktop that I'm on now because okay, the keyboard's way, way down below where the picture is. But the print, when I type, is gonna appear way up here. Autistic people cannot make that attention shift. So that's why you have to use something like an iPad because the print appears next to the virtual keyboard, or you're gonna have to put a box up here with a keyboard on it, so the print appears right next to the keyboard. That's one of the secrets to helping 'em learn how to type. And I knew a teacher, I think her name was Mary Crossley, I'm not sure that did this like 30 years ago or with a box. And there's some good books written by people that type independently, like Tito Mukhopadhyay, How Can I Talk If My Lips Don't Move? There's a Japanese boy, The Reason I Jump is a sequel too. The Reason I Jump I think is a much better book with a lot more insight in it and wou ld recommend a sequel. I think people that are working with non-speaking individuals need to read these books. Now, I'm not talking about three year olds, I'm talking about older children and adults. Keith: So is there a difference between savants and regular geniuses, people who are really intelligent. Is there a difference and what are those differences? Temple: Well, there's some people with autism that are extremely intelligent. Yeah. And there's, you see there's a whole range, but there's a small amount of 'em that are savants, you know, like Rainman. And then there's others that have an extreme, I'm an extreme visual thinker, which makes me really good at things like understanding animals, photography and mechanical things. And then there's some that are extreme mathematicians, but they're not savants. I have been out to the tech companies, you know, that make computers and other things and oh, there's many undiagnosed people with autism in those tech companies. Keith: Yeah, you talk a lot about Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Alan Turning, father of modern computing, Einstein, Edison, I believe, titans of their industries and people who have really reshaped or shaped how we live and conduct our lives. Knowing that, what would you hope that people who are neurotypical would know about people with autism? Temple: Well, there's some things I talked about some of the things for work, working memory issues, needing written checklists, avoiding multitasking jobs. But I do a lot of talking to business leaders and I tell them, you need the skills. You need the skills. Your best elevator mechanic, your best airplane mechanic is not going to interview well. He is likely to be socially awkward. I worked with a lot of these people. Your very best computer people may not interview well. You see, I think it's really important for an autistic person to be able to show off their portfolio and that's the reason why the way I sold jobs is I showed my drawings to people and in other words, selling my work. I make it very plain to business leaders, you need these skills. I kind of look at it this way, a brain can be more social, emotional or a brain can be sort of more thinking and cognitive and in what they do. So if you were to take the whole population of the world, half of the population's probably gonna move towards the social emotional and the other half lean a bit more towards the interesting thinking and logic. And, you know, the mildest forms of autism is probably just a personality variant. You know, when does being kind of nerdy and geeky need a label on it? There's no black and white dividing line. It's not like having tuberculosis where you either have tuberculosis or you do not have tuberculosis and they can test for it with a lab test. It is a true continuous trait. And I'm basically, I am what I do. And I wanna see these kids that are different today, get up and get into a good career because that's what gives me a satisfying life, is having an interesting career and where I could actually improve things. I think I helped improve how cattle and other livestock are treated. Keith: What would you think about people with autism becoming ASL interpreters? Is that a job that they would excel at? Temple: Well, yeah. You mean be a deaf interpreter for example. Keith: Yes. Temple: Okay. Well that'd be a great job for 'em. And they're gonna be judged on their work. Because some are probably better than others. Yeah, that'd be a great job for somebody on the spectrum, would not be a great job for me. But it might be a great job for somebody else. Keith: Yeah. There's a difference about being an ASL interpreter, American Sign Language and Deaf Interpreter. Temple: Yeah. One thing I'm a believer in is, we need to take kids and young adults and expose them to lots of different things. I get asked all the time, how did I end up in the cattle industry? I ended up in it because I was exposed to it as a teenager. I did not grow up in it. Too many kids today, they've taken the hands on classes out. They don't use tools, they don't know how to measure things. You know, we need to be putting all those hands-on classes back in. Some schools are doing it now because you can only get interested in something that you are exposed to. You're not exposed to something, how could you possibly get interested in it? I also suggest to parents, if a child's fixated on cars, then let's do reading with cars. Let's do math with cars. Let's learn how they work. Let's read about the history of cars. You see how I'm taking this interest in cars and I'm broadening it? Parents and teachers don't wanna just stomp out fixations. What I wanna do is broaden them and make 'em less fixated. When I was a little kid, I would do constant pictures of a single horse head and mother suggested to me, well, let's do the whole horse. Let's draw the saddle. She took my drawing interest and broadened it. Keith: So how was it going to school in the pre ADA generation? Temple: Well, I was very lucky that there was a small, little local school that I went to where my mother and the teacher just got together. And then when I got older, I got kicked out of a regular high school and that was a disaster. And that's where my family did have money to send me to special school. Because a regular school just didn't work. And when I went to the special school, they put me to work cleaning horse stalls. They wanted to make sure I learned how to work, which was really important. Now there's a lot of grandparents of my generation that are autistic and I've talked to 'em at meetings. And one of the things that helped them, the Asperger type where there's no speech delay, they had paper routes at age eleven, they learned to work. Also in the fifties, table manners, shaking hands, learning how to take turns in conversation, that was taught. That was actually taught in the fifties to all children. Now I was very severe at age three, so I was the kind of kid that normally got put in an institution, but the more Asperger type where there's no speech delay, a lot of those had problems with relationships. But I've talked to a bunch of 'em that had decent jobs. So people my age, maybe, you know, ten years younger and that's where the more kind of the social skills teaching, like we sit down at dinner and I'd reach across the table to get the mashed potato dish and mother would say, ask your sister to pass it. She'd give me the instructions. Kids were actually taught this and I think that's helped some of those grandfathers and grandmothers get those jobs. Keith: So, going back to your memoir again, Thinking In Pictures chapter seven, it's called “Dating Data”, and I love how you use the analogy of data on Star Trek, the Next Generation. What are your thoughts on relationships and people with autism in general? Temple: Although I think relationships often work out the best is when there's a friendship through shared interests. Like when I was in high school, one of the places where I was not bullied was horseback riding. That was a place where I was not bullied. And, we need to be working on friends who share interests. One enterprising teacher started a Star Wars club for an elementary school kid that was being bullied, other kids joined that, that's an easy thing to do and it didn't even cost anything. That kind of stuff is easy to do, to help get friends who share interests. Also, I had to learn that I just couldn't go on and on and on talking about my favorite thing, just over and over and over and over again, to the point where everybody else was bored with it. Keith: If there are any aspiring advocates who are just starting out on their advocacy journey like you did, you have experience, a wealth of experience, what would be your five suggestions to the advocates of the next generation? Temple: Well, the first thing, I didn't do any autism advocacy until a little tiny bit in my late twenties. I was out in the feed yards, designing equipment and being a woman in the seventies going into the cattle industry was a much bigger barrier than autism. Much, much bigger barrier. And most of my problems were with middle management. I was writing as livestock editor for our State Farm magazine, and it was, and I had all this, you know, all this work stuff I was doing. Then the advocacy started. And I've told a lot of people that I think they might be a more effective advocate if they, along with the advocacy, had a job that had nothing to do with it. I mean, I am writing for the magazine. It was one of my first jobs. Had nothing to do with autism. I had to, there were certain meetings I had to cover. Arizona Cattle Feeders, the Arizona Cattle Growers, the Arizona National Stock Show. Those things I had to cover every year. Then I would do some feature stories, and this had nothing to do with autism and I got respect because I was good at writing articles. And when I covered the kennel feeders meeting, I summarized those speeches accurately and I got, you know, respect for that. So I started out with work and the biggest problem I'm seeing now, especially, you know, fully verbal teenagers, is they're not making the transition to work. And then I can think about the times I'm out in the plants and I was working with people that were definitely autistic, that owned metal shops and had patented equipment. Now I think one of the places where I think a lot of people today will need help on starting their own business, it is a lot more complicated today. This is something where you could set up an accounting service that people that have independent businesses could use that was reasonable in cost, because that's where a lot of people with autism need help, setting up a business and running a business part of a business. Keith: And so you want, or you recommend that people, advocates start out by just doing work unrelated to advocacy? Temple: Well, I'm not. What I'm saying is that they either could do the work first. I did the work first, or at least, do the work along with the advocacy. Because I think they're gonna be a better advocate if they can talk about, okay, this is how I got this job. This is how I'm keeping this job. I think that's gonna help 'em to be a better advocate. I mean, they could do the two things at the same time. I was probably a good 10 years of work then, the advocacy started one little meeting at a time with a lady named Warner Jean King, who was doing occupational therapy with sensory integration with autistic kids, you know, in the seventies. And I do talk to some of her groups. And then I got invited to do some talks in the early eighties with a continuing education group and then I was approached by a small press who did my first book Emergence Labeled Autistic. Keith: So what do you hope that listeners with disabilities would get out of listening to this episode? Temple: I'm sorry, I didn't understand that question. Keith: Sorry. What do you hope that listeners with disabilities would take away from this episode? Temple: Well, I think we need to be, you know, getting out and doing things. And I know one of the things, it's a problem, I've talked to a lot of people about it, is if they're getting disability payments, they do too much work and then they lose their health insurance. And I think that's a huge issue because that's gonna motivate not working because you can't afford to lose your health insurance. Now it's different in different states and some states are really bad. I don't think I'm gonna name any states and some states are a whole lot better in terms of the amount of money that a person with a, you know, that's on social security, I may give, put the wrong names for some of this stuff, payment. But I remember talking to one man and he goes, it's kind of a trap. That's his words, not mine. And what I think they need to be doing is, no matter what, keep the health insurance. I had a blind roommate when I was in graduate school, and Gloria and I were discussing this and she said, I could give up the SSI payment if I could just keep the health insurance. That was in the seventies. And I'm still hearing that today. It’s a real problem. Some states will let you earn quite a bit of money. and there's other states, I was just in one of them, you can't earn anything. And you lose your health insurance. I think that's something that advocates need to work on changing it. I think it's just terrible. Keith: So what do you hope that listeners who have yet to become neurodiverse, would take away from this episode? Temple: Well, there's all kinds of disabilities and they need very different kinds of accommodations. And what I think we need to have is the emphasis on what people can do. I have another book called Navigating Autism, I did with Debra Moore, and she talks about label locking where parents and teachers get so much into the label, they don't think the person can do anything. You know, let's say somebody's using a wheelchair, well then they can assume they can't do anything. Well, they can do a lot of things. Programming computers is one of them. If they were mathematically minded, they could do that, that could be something they could do and do really well. I have an old-fashioned telephone answering service. I know about 20 years ago when it broke, I called them and the owner says, I can't roll over the cables and that's when I realized he was in a wheelchair. He was running that answering service business. I only knew about it because he told me he couldn't roll over a cable. And he owned a business. You see, this is the kind of thing that I'm, I talked to another guy who was a beautiful photographer, absolutely beautiful in a wheelchair, and he had one of these power assist chairs where it works like a manual chair, but it's a power assist. And I'm going, you ought to be going to flower shows and taking pictures of flowers. All you gotta do is show your portfolio. You're hired. ADA accessible convention center, that'd be really cool. Oh, those pictures of flowers were so beautiful. That's the work. And people will pay a bunch of money for that. Keith: So going back to the movie, particularly the end where I got really choked up, first of all, we shared three things. My voice didn’t come in until age seven. My first language was a version of ASL. We both didn't get through high school algebra. I took it three times. Temple: Well, I couldn't, I don't know if I could graduate from high school today because I can't do algebra. And fortunately college math wasn't algebra, but I can't do algebra. And I think on some of this that need to back off, I have talked to students that want to become a Veterinary nurse. It's a two year community college degree. They're on their second and third algebra class and you don't need algebra to be a Veterinary nurse. Now, I think one of the reasons why algebra is being pushed is that more mathematical minds think that you need algebra for logical thinking. And I was horrified when I was doing the book signing for Visual Thinking. Just last year we did one of the talks at a school and I sat down with the principal for an hour and he didn't know what my kind of thinking was. He didn't know it existed. And I said, you'd like the air conditioning to work in this building, wouldn't you? Yeah. Gets hot in the summer. You're gonna need people like me that can't do algebra. But I've often thought about, what if I waved a magic wand and I'm now 18 years old. I've just failed high school, couldn't graduate because of algebra, but they let me keep my knowledge. What would I do? I'd go in the back door of a business and I know exactly how to do it. I saw people in the meat industry get a job on the line. 15 years later, they were project managers or for the new cooler edition. And I'd head over to the Amazon warehouse, or if I could get to it, the new chip factory they're building because I have a goal. I'm gonna design the next one. And that career path is completely doable. I've seen people do it and I know how big corporations work. I just go right in the back door. And a lot of people don't realize the back door exists, but half of all good jobs are backdoor. Keith: So the ending of the movie, when you took your roommate to view what you made at the end. You said I don’t know what is coming next, meaning I don’t know what is on the other side of this life, but I want to leave a legacy behind, feel like I made a difference. Temple: Well, I'd like to do something as a positive difference. We've got too many people today that go out and do something really bad that's making a negative difference. Keith: And so my question is, do you feel you have done that throughout your life? Temple: Well, I have, my mind doesn't think, verbal thinkers, like regular verbal thinkers tend to be very top down. They'll talk about accommodations or you know, an inclusive classroom or whatever. And it's very, very vague. You know, I think in specifics, just the other day I was walking to the parking garage and ran into a student who was on the autistic spectrum. I made her day. Okay. I think I made a difference in her life. I think I've helped inspire her and we took a picture in the parking garage. That was a good trip to the parking garage and you know, these are the kinds of things now. I'm way past retirement time and I wanna help the next generation, show 'em that they can do it. One of the things that motivated me in the seventies when I was working on the projects that were shown in the movie, and those are accurate, I wanted to prove I wasn't stupid. That was a very, very big motivation for me. A lot of people thought I was stupid and I wouldn't amount to anything. Keith: And so what are you currently working on right now? Temple: Well, I'm still teaching my class and livestock handling. I'm doing a lot of speaking engagements, a lot of Zoom calls. I'm also, you know, writing papers on livestock subjects. So I'm gonna be working on writing a paper on how I develop some animal welfare evaluation systems that we aim for students to read. There's very practical things. Too often we have way too much theory and not enough practical. Let's go back to accommodations. Okay. We talked about the pilot's checklist. We talked about avoiding rapid multi tasking, but some other accommodations might be sensory breaks. Another accommodation at work might be LED lighting that flickers, and that can be a problem for a segment of the autistic people. And so how do you deal with that if you can't get rid of it? Buy a lamp, put a bulb in it. Probably be an LED, but find one that does not flicker and put it next to your desk. A real bright one. And if you can get the lights changed, great. But if you can't, you have to override those lights with a brighter light that doesn't flicker. You see, I like to give people these kinds of practical things. There's noise canceling headsets, but the problem is, if you wear them all the time, your sound sensitivity will worsen. What you wanna do is have it with you all the time. Try not to wear it all the time, but have it with you. That gives you control. And if you're working with kids, let the kids turn on the vacuum cleaner or the hair dryer, something that really they don't like the sound, because when they control that sound, they may be better able to tolerate it when they turn it on and off. Usually these are the kind of tips I like to pass along. There's some individuals when they go to read, they see the print jiggle on the page because it's the problem with the circuits in the back of the brain that form the graphic files. Here's a simple thing that sometimes works. Try printing the homework on light pastel paper, like for example, in my children's book, Calling All Minds, you can see there's some light blue paper on that pastel paper like that light blue, light tan, light gray. Try these different pastel papers, put in a copier. This works for some people. I like to pass on these very simple things. I like the color pastel paper. You know, the thing to do with the LED lights, the pilots checklist, things they could, simple things that you can do that can make a big difference. Keith: So you just mentioned that one of the great motivators of your life was proving to others that you weren’t stupid and you've done that. You've become world renowned. How do you feel about what you've done with your life? Temple: Well, right now I get asked how I feel about people coming up and recognizing me at the airport and stuff like that. And I feel it's a responsibility. I've always gotta behave well, and I hope that I can inspire younger individuals to get up and do things because I found that some of the most interesting and fun things I ever did was sitting around with other people and we were figuring out how to build stuff. It was a lot of stress on those jobs because we had to make equipment that worked but just figuring out how to build stuff. That's friends who share interests and yep, I'm doing advocacy. But, just yesterday I went out to a feed yard. I saw some really nice cattle there and I sat on the feed bunk and I'll let the cows lick me. Oh. That was a good afternoon. I enjoyed that. Keith: So you mentioned at the top of the interview that your mother and your aunt weighed a huge part in your life, in your upbringing. If they could see you now or if you could tell them something, what would that be? Temple: Well, my mother always was, she kinda had a good sense of how to push me to do things. She'd always give me choices. And we were limited on how much television we could watch. You know, they wanted us to get outside and play around. And I can't emphasize enough, you know, the importance of teachers and mentors. I just cannot emphasize enough how important that is. I just wanna warn you that we are coming up against a hard stop, in about ten minutes. Keith: Yes. Thank you. Well, I really enjoyed the interview. I enjoyed meeting you, and I do hope that you will stay in touch and that I can interview you again. Temple: Yep, we could do that. We could do that again. And I really liked what Stephen Hawking said about disability, and I'm sure everybody knows that Stephen Hawking is a famous Physicist and he told the New York Times shortly before he died, concentrate on those things your disability does not prevent you from doing well. He could do math in his head super well and not very much else, but he did math. He did the thing that his disability doesn't prevent him from doing well. I really liked that when I found out that Stephen Hawkings said that. Keith: Well, Temple, thank you so much for your time and authenticity and I have enjoyed your work and I look forward to seeing what you do next. Temple: Well, I'm gonna just keep on doing what I'm doing. Put my book here, Visual Thinking. If you wanna figure out how you think and what might be good jobs for you, you can read this book. We also discussed Thinking In Pictures, my memoir from 26 years ago, like we discussed earlier. I'm gonna just say it now because the interpreters were not here. I discussed my experiences with medication and I had some very favorable experiences that are described in detail in this book. And I just wanna make sure that got into the part of the interview where you had the interpreters. Keith: Thank you again. Take care my friend. Temple: I will, I'm gonna sign off and thank you very, very much for having me. Keith: Thank you. Okay, bye. Temple: Bye. Keith: You have been listening to Disability Empowerment Now. I would like to thank my guest, You, our listener and the Disability Empowerment Team that made this episode possible. More information about the podcast can be found at DisabilityEmpowermentNow.com or on social media @disabilityempowermentnow. The podcast is available wherever you listen to podcasts or on the official website. Don’t forget to rate, comment, and share the podcast! This episode of Disability Empowerment Now is copyrighted 2023. Keith: Bienvenidos a Disability Empowerment Now, temporada tres. Soy su anfitrión, Keith Murfee-DeConcini. Hoy estoy hablando con Temple Grandin, un portavoz para el autismo, autora, académica y conductista animal. Temple, bienvenida al episodio. Temple: Me da mucho gusto estar aquí el día de hoy. Keith: Muchas gracias. Para las personas que nos escuchan y tal vez no sepan quién es usted, ¿puede presentarse y contarnos qué le puso en su camino profesional? Temple: Bueno, ahora trabajo como profesora de ciencia animal en la Universidad de Colorado State, pero no hablaba hasta los cuatro años. Tenía síntomas de autismo muy severos a los dos y tres años, meciéndome y haciendo berrinches. Tuve mucha suerte de ingresar a una educación muy alta a temprana edad, con un terapeuta del habla maravilloso. Eso fue muy importante y tuve muchos buenos maestros que me ayudaron y quiero dar crédito a mi madre y a los otros buenos maestros que trabajaron conmigo, ayudándome a hacer cosas nuevas y alentando mis habilidades en el arte. Tuve una maestra maravillosa en el tercer grado de primaria, y cuando tenía ocho años, no sabía leer y mi maestra estaba muy preocupada por esto. Entonces, mi madre me enseñó a leer en casa con fonética y compramos un libro divertido, el Mago de Oz, un libro muy divertido de mi generación. Y mi madre me enseñó los sonidos. Ya lo sabía por la canción del abecedario, que tiene aproximadamente la mitad de los sonidos y ella leía una página y luego se detenía en una parte interesante y me hacía leer más y más sobre cómo pronunciar las palabras. Y muy rápidamente pasé de no leer para nada a leer a nivel de un estudiante de sexto grado de secundaria. Tuve muchos problemas en la secundaria, sufrí acoso y los niños se burlaban de mí. Acabé siendo expulsada de una secundaria en noveno grado por tirarle un libro a una chica que me estaba acosando, pero tuve otros maestros muy buenos. Mi maestro de ciencias hizo que me gustara estudiar. Solo quiero dar crédito a todos los buenos maestros que tuve. Keith: Gracias. En su autobiografía, Thinking in Pictures, habla mucho sobre el autismo y la medicina, en el capítulo seis, "Believer in Biochemistry", mencionó que está tomando un antidepresivo. ¿Por qué las personas con autismo suelen requerir dosis más bajas para un tratamiento eficaz? Temple: Bueno, hay una diferencia entre usar un antidepresivo para tratar la ansiedad, que era mi problema, y tratar la depresión y la etiqueta tiene esas dosis para la depresión. Pero para la ansiedad, se suelen necesitar dosis mucho más bajas y se comete un error muy común y mis padres me lo habían dicho una y otra vez. A mi niño, o adolescente, le fue muy bien con una dosis baja. Doblamos la dosis y ya no podía dormir y se agitaba. Ahora, yo comencé a tomar este medicamento, cuando tenía poco más de treinta años. Tuve ataques de pánico que empeoraron a lo largo de mis veinte años y empeoraron cada vez más. Ataques de colitis que no paraban. Y había leído un artículo en los años 70 en Psychology Today llamado "Promise of Biological Psychiatry" y luego fui a la biblioteca usando las habilidades que me había enseñado mi maestro de ciencias para buscar artículos médicos. Y revisé los síntomas y tenía como ocho de los 10, pero me resistí a la idea de tomar medicamento. Así que dejé ese artículo a un lado y luego tuve una cirugía ocular muy angustioso, y eso me estresó demasiado. Así que saqué el artículo y comencé a tomar una dosis baja de un medicamento anticuado llamado imipramina. Este es mi libro de Thinking In Pictures donde hablé sobre esto. Aunque esa información ya tiene 25 años, sigue siendo correcta. Los medicamentos no han cambiado. Todavía están usando los mismos medicamentos. Ahora, se administran demasiados medicamentos a los niños pequeños y, en especial, medicamentos con efectos secundarios cada vez más graves, como los antipsicóticos atípicos. Se administra demasiado de eso. Pero para los adolescentes y adultos en el espectro autista, hay un segmento de ellos que sufre de una ansiedad extremadamente alta. No todo el mundo. Solo un segmento y yo era una de esas personas con una ansiedad muy, muy alta en su biología. Un escáner cerebral mostró que mi centro del miedo era más grande de lo normal y el medicamento me ayudó bastante. Lo he estado tomando durante 40 años y planeo seguirlo tomando. He visto una dosis baja de Prozac ayudar a las personas y se estabilizaron y también he visto desastres cuando dejaron de tomar el medicamento. Muy fea situación. Keith: Entonces, ¿qué le diría a alguien con autismo que batalla con la idea de tomar medicamento? Temple: Bueno, batallé con eso un poco, y lo digo por aquí porque cuando encontré el artículo por primera vez después de leer el artículo en Psychology Today, fui a la biblioteca y encontré los artículos. Los dejé a un lado durante dos años. Luché con algunas de las ideas de tomar medicamento, pero luego tuve que someterme a una cirugía ocular muy aterradora, cirugía plástica, conciencia, agujas y cosas que me llegaban al ojo. Y eso me dejó muy pero muy estresada. Y luego me di cuenta de que, si no tomo el medicamento, me voy a meter en problemas. Y la colitis estaba empeorando y empeorando y empeorando y empeorando cada vez más. Por eso comía yogur y gelatina. Y cuando comencé a tomar el medicamento, dentro de una semana más o menos, la colitis desapareció y, por eso, el capítulo se llama "Believer in Biochemistry". Cuando los medicamentos funcionan, solo suele funcionar una cosa. Y fue entonces cuando me di cuenta de que la ansiedad era biológica. Quiero enfatizar que no todas las personas autistas tienen esta ansiedad severa, pero yo fui una de esas personas. Y luego, después de tomar el medicamento por un tiempo, me puse a pensar, bueno, supongo que así es como se sienten las supuestas personas normales, pero era como estar en un estado constante de miedo todo el tiempo. Constantemente con miedo a las cosas más pequeñas. Mi corazón latía duro, escuchaba un ruido en medio de la noche, me despertaba con el corazón latiendo demasiado fuerte, a veces tenía dificultad para tragar y funcionó. Y conozco a algunas otras personas a las que sí les funcionó y conozco a algunas personas que tenían trastorno bipolar y podían tomar litio o algún otro medicamento, y funcionó. Todo lo que puedo decir es que si estás estable, estás tomando una dosis baja. El único efecto secundario que tengo es que tengo que tomar mucha agua. Es el único efecto secundario que tengo, y podrías, yo también cometí el error de decir, ay, podría dejar de tomar esto. Pero luego me di cuenta que no podía, pero he visto personas como si estuvieran estables tomando litio. Dejaron el medicamento y luego uno de los problemas es que a veces el cerebro tiene problemas cuando dejan el medicamento y ya no funciona tan bien cuando lo vuelven a tomar. Ni siquiera sé si estaría viva hoy si no hubiera tomado el medicamento. Mi salud a principios de mis treinta años era muy mala. Probablemente habría tenido que someterme a una cirugía para que me sacaran la mitad de mis entrañas. La colitis empeoró mucho y lo sorprendente es que la colitis desapareció dentro de las dos semanas posteriores a que comencé a tomar el medicamento, y ahora solo sufro de pequeños fragmentos de colitis. Keith: Vaya. Así que en su nuevo libro, que salió el año pasado. Temple: Sí, Visual Thinking. Keith: Visual Thinking. Usted habla mucho sobre la mentalidad de discapacidad y, en su opinión, ¿es buena o mala y cuál es su opinión sobre la educación especial? Temple: Bueno, tenemos que mirar las edades. Empecemos con los niños de tres años. Yo estaba en un programa muy bueno a los tres años y creo mucho en la educación a temprana edad, y sé que ha existido mucha controversia sobre los diferentes métodos de enseñanza. Solo diré que los niños pequeños de tres años que no hablan necesitan pasar unas 20 horas a la semana con un maestro eficaz. Y lo que he observado es que algunos maestros tienen la capacidad de trabajar con estos niños y otros que no. Así que esto es lo que se debería conseguir de un programa para niños pequeños que se especializan en el habla. Otra cosa que se trabajó conmigo es cómo esperar y tomar turnos en los juegos. Te enseñan a inhibir una respuesta, y no hubo énfasis en el contacto visual. Eso no fue enfatizado. Fue el habla, tomar turnos y luego las habilidades; cepillarse el pelo, ponerse el abrigo y usar cubiertos. Y luego, la cuarta cosa es que al niño le debería de gustar ir a terapia, deberías estar mejorando. Al niño le debe gustar ir a terapia. Ahora, con respecto a la mentalidad de discapacidad, uno de los grandes problemas que veo es que veo a adolescentes totalmente verbales que les va muy bien en la escuela, pero que no están aprendiendo las habilidades de la vida. No están aprendiendo cosas que aprendí en la primaria; las compras, pedir comida en restaurantes, las cuentas bancarias, la lavandería, aprender a ahorrar dinero, habilidades básicas para la vida. Ya sabes, tenemos que estar enseñando esas cosas. Y entonces, ¿qué hay de las habilidades laborales? Las transiciones bruscas son muy malas para las personas con autismo, por lo que debemos comenzar a enseñar habilidades laborales a los jóvenes y eso es diferente a las habilidades académicas. Tal vez a los 11 años, trabajar como voluntario, un mercado artesanal, un asilo de ancianos donde paseas al perro de otra persona, donde alguien fuera de la familia es el jefe. Y luego, cuando sean de una edad legal para trabajar, un trabajo puede ser en el supermercado o en algún otro trabajo que quiero evitar. Estos son los trabajos que quiero evitar. Trabajos rápidos de multitarea, atender la ventanilla de McDonald's. No. Otra cosa es que no puedo recordar largas cadenas de instrucciones verbales. Cualquier tarea que requiera secuencia, déjame anotarla en la lista de verificación de un piloto. Así es, más o menos, mi memoria funcional externa. Pero el problema, creo que parte del problema con la mentalidad de discapacidad en el autismo es que han cambiado el diagnóstico. Así que el autismo va desde Einstein, sin habla hasta los tres años. Él estaría en un programa de autismo hoy, para alguien que es mucho más grave y puede tener muchos otros problemas médicos. La epilepsia, además del autismo no es el único diagnóstico, y originalmente para un diagnóstico de autismo, había que tener un retraso en el habla. Eso es lo que yo tenía. Luego había el síndrome de Asperger, alguien socialmente torpe y sin retraso en el habla. Luego, en el 2013, hace 10 años, todo esto se fusionó. Creo que fue un gran error, porque si a una persona se le diagnostica TDAH o dislexia, eso es mucho más estrecho. Dificultades de lectura, dificultades de tensión. Pero ahora tienes este espectro autista que es tan amplio y verás, soy una pensadora visual, así que pensé que era un gran error combinar todas esas cosas juntas. Keith: Siguiendo con lo que acaba de decir, el espectro se ha vuelto increíblemente amplio. Templo: Sí, así es. Keith: Y sé que antes de que se llamara autismo, se llamaba síndrome de Asperger. ¿Hay alguna diferencia entre los dos trastornos? Temple: Bueno, la diferencia era que con el autismo, originalmente, el niño había que tener un retraso en el habla. Habrías tenido un retraso en el habla para ser llamado autista, en cambio para ser llamado Asperger, no hay retraso en el habla. Asperger no tiene un retraso evidente en el habla, pero sí síntomas autistas. Esa fue la principal diferencia y luego los fusionaron todos juntos. Así que ahora tienes a alguien como Einstein o alguien que está programando computadoras para una empresa de tecnología con la misma etiqueta que alguien que incluso podría tener otras dificultades neurológicas además del autismo. Keith: Gracias por aclarar eso. Entonces, entremos más en su nuevo libro Visual Thinking. Temple: Sí, aquí mismo. Bueno, en Visual Thinking, hablo de tres diferentes tipos de formas en que las personas piensan y como tienen diferentes habilidades. Soy una visualizadora de objetos. Todo lo que pienso es una imagen fotográfica. Y si ves la película de HBO, eso muestra exactamente cómo pienso, en imágenes. Ahora bien, otro tipo de pensador es el visual espacial. Esta persona piensa en patrones. Como yo pienso en imágenes como fotos, el visual espacial piensa en patrones. Esta es tu mente matemática. En química, física, programación de computadoras, y luego tienes los pensadores verbales. Y muchos educadores son pensadores altamente verbales. Piensan en palabras. Yo pensé que todo el mundo pensaba en imágenes hasta que cumplí 30 años y fue entonces cuando aprendí que no todo el mundo piensa en imágenes. Y mucha gente son una mezcla. Así que echemos un vistazo a los tipos de trabajos en los que algunos de estos diferentes pensadores podrían ser buenos. Desde mi perspectiva, como visualizadora de objetos, va a ser arte, fotografía, trabajar con animales, dispositivos mecánicos, arreglar carros. El arte y la mecánica van de la mano. Luego tienes el visual espacial, aquí te refieres a las matemáticas, la música, la química, las matemáticas superiores. Y los pensadores de palabras, obviamente, son buenos con las palabras. Y, ay, estoy muy interesada en ayudar a las personas a tener carreras satisfactorias porque una de las cosas que ha hecho que mi vida valga la pena y que se me ha hecho interesante es tener una carrera interesante. Eso ha sido extremadamente importante para mí, y quiero ayudar a otras personas a entrar en carreras interesantes porque cuando estaba trabajando en equipos en las plantas empacadoras de carne, trabajé con muchos trabajadores metalúrgicos calificados que estaban inventando, inventando equipos y algunos que apenas se habían graduado de la secundaria. Y alrededor del 20% de las personas con las que trabajé hoy serían autistas, disléxicos o sufrirían de TDAH. Keith: Entonces, ¿todas las personas con autismo son pensadores visuales por defecto? Templo: No, no, no, no, no. No, ellos no lo son. Ese fue un error que cometí cuando escribí Thinking In Pictures hace 26 años. Cometí el error de pensar que todo el mundo era un pensador visual, eso está mal. Solo una parte de las personas en el espectro autista son pensadores visuales. Entonces el otro tipo de pensador es el pensador matemático. Piensan en patrones. Y luego hay algunas personas autistas que piensan en palabras. Suelen ser buenos en idiomas extranjeros, les gustan los datos, como las estadísticas deportivas, las cosas históricas, les encantan los datos. Pero lo que suele suceder en el autismo es que es menos probable que tengas una mezcla de los diferentes tipos de pensamiento, mucho, mucho menos probable. Muchas de las supuestas personas normales tienen más probabilidades de ser una mezcla. En cambio, si se trata de una persona autista, podrías tener un visualizador de objetos extremo como yo, que es bueno en mecánica artística, fotografía y con los animales. O un matemático extremo, físico, programador de computadoras, músico, químico. O si tienes un pensador verbal, tienden a ser más extremos. En cambio, las supuestas personas normales, sueles tener muchas más mezclas de los diferentes tipos de pensamientos. Y esto se discute en mi libro, Visual Thinking y he hablado sobre cómo logramos tener buenas carreras utilizando estas habilidades. Doy muchas charlas a grandes corporaciones y les digo que se necesitan las habilidades de las personas con autismo para hacer cosas como arreglar ascensores, por ejemplo, desde mi perspectiva. Keith: Siguiendo con lo que acaba de decir, ¿qué ambiente de trabajo sería ideal para las personas con autismo? Temple: Bueno, puede haber algunos problemas sensoriales. Hablaré sobre las cosas en las que no los quiero tener. Un ambiente rápido de multitarea, este sería un mal trabajo, atender una ventanilla de McDonald's. Buenos trabajos, programadores de computadoras, ellos pueden sentarse en su escritorio y programar computadoras. Podría sentarme y hacer mis dibujos de diseño. De hecho, aquí mismo están algunos de mis dibujos para la ganadería. Podía hacer mis dibujos y la forma en que vendía los trabajos era mostrarle a la gente mis dibujos. Así vendí trabajos. Mostré mi portafolio de trabajos comerciales. Hay muchas cosas así. Y luego hay algunos trabajos en los que tienes que hacerlo, ya sabes, hay muchas personas de mi tipo de mente que son buenas en oficios especializados. Pero lo que tenemos que evitar son largas cadenas de información verbal. Hubo una historia muy triste en la que un hombre autista fue despedido de dos puestos de aprendizaje de electricista porque el jefe se ponía a decir bla, bla, bla, bla, bla, lámpara, bla, bla, bla, bla, interruptor de atenuación. Y esta persona autista no podía recordar las cosas que debía instalar ese día. Si se hubieran tomado dos minutos para hacer una lista, yo la llamo una lista de verificación del piloto, hacer una lista con algunos puntos de las cosas para instalar ese día, habrían conseguido el trabajo. Eso es algo que yo haría. Anotaba los aparatos eléctricos que tenía que instalar ese día. Y si el jefe decía no tengo tiempo para eso, yo decía que si los pilotos necesitan una lista de verificación, yo también la necesito. Y quiero que todos sepan que los pilotos tienen que usar una lista de verificación para cada vuelo. Keith: Así que empieza Visual Thinking reflexionando sobre el hecho de que muchas clases de taller y otras clases de comercio prácticamente hayan desaparecido de la educación estadounidense, aunque en Arizona, donde estoy yo, todavía enseñan algunas, pero para la gran mayoría, las clases que usted tomó cuando estaba en la escuela ya no son favorecidas. Temple: Bueno, el problema es que vamos a necesitar estas habilidades. En mi libro, Visual Thinking, hablé sobre los problemas muy graves relacionados a la pérdida de habilidades porque eliminamos los intercambios de habilidades. Los Estados Unidos ya no fabrica la máquina de fabricación de chips electrónicos. No hacemos eso. Viene de Holanda. Ya no fabricamos equipos de procesamiento de aves, equipos de procesamiento de carne de cerdo. Muchísimas cosas eléctricas especializadas. Y esto vuelve a eliminar las clases de oficios especializados. Ves eso y el tipo de personas que son buenas en estas cosas son personas como yo. Hace poco estaba en una llamada de Zoom con una clase de secundaria y hablé sobre los diferentes tipos de pensadores, los pensadores visuales como yo y los pensadores matemáticos y los pensadores de palabras. Y esta chica se acercó a la computadora, porque tenían que ir a la computadora para contestar las preguntas, y dijo, “mi consejero escolar me dijo que no tomara ninguna clase de Votech.” Bueno, les diré, estas serán las cosas en las que los trabajos no podrán ser reemplazados por computadoras. Alguien tiene que arreglar los ascensores. Alguien tiene que arreglar aviones, trenes y carros. Estos trabajos no serán reemplazados por computadoras. Keith: Votech es vocacional, ¿correcto? Templo: Cierto. Es vocacional. Ahora quiero enfatizar la diferencia entre los oficios calificados de alto nivel como un electricista, un fontanero, un fabricante de metales que puede inventar dispositivos mecánicos. Esto es para las personas con las que trabajé. Inventaron todo tipo de dispositivos mecánicos. Esto no es colocar azulejos ni colocar materiales para techos. Eso es solo trabajo. Estoy hablando de los tipos de oficios especializados que requieren inteligencia visual real. Keith: Entonces, hay una gran tendencia en las redes sociales como TikTok, donde las personas hacen contenido como, si haces tal y cual, puede que seas autista. ¿Cree que el autodiagnóstico es útil o perjudicial? Temple: Bueno, hay muchos adultos mayores que cuando descubren su autismo, suelen descubrir que son autistas cuando sus hijos son diagnosticados. De hecho, tengo este libro aquí, Different, Not Less y son 18 personas, personas mayores diagnosticadas más tarde en la vida que cuentan sus experiencias, y descubrieron que eso les dio una mejor idea de los problemas con sus relaciones. Después de todo, un diagnóstico de autismo es solo un perfil de comportamiento. No existe una prueba de laboratorio ni una radiografía para diagnosticar el autismo. Una vez se me acercó una señora en el aeropuerto de Denver y me dijo que mi libro Thinking In Pictures la ayudó a comprender mejor a su esposo ingeniero, que probablemente estaba en el espectro autista, y que salvó su matrimonio porque entonces entendió que la forma en la que piensa y siente es diferente a ella. Así que creo que eso puede ser muy útil. La mayoría de las personas mayores que son diagnosticadas más tarde en la vida sienten una sensación de alivio. Eso es algo bueno. Pero la otra cosa que me preocupa son los adolescentes y adultos jóvenes, especialmente los que son totalmente verbales, que no aprenden ninguna habilidad para la vida cotidiana. He hablado con los padres y les digo, ¿alguna vez su hijo de 16 años ha ido solo a una tienda y ha comprado algo y ha hablado con el personal de la tienda? No, eso es un problema. Keith: Mencionó la película de HBO al principio del episodio, la vi anoche y es increíble. La última media hora me hizo llorar. Fue tan conmovedora. Quiero saber sobre sus pensamientos y partes favoritas de la película y ¿cómo fue conocer a Claire Danes, la actriz que le interpretó? Temple: Bueno, quiero hablar sobre algunas de las cosas que me gustaron mucho y las cosas que fueron muy precisas. Lo primero es que mostró cómo funciona mi pensamiento visual. Mostró exactamente cómo funciona mi mente. También mostró proyectos que en realidad desarrollé, y esa es otra cosa que me gustó mucho. Y Claire Danes, ella logró convertirse en mí. Le dimos cintas viejas, cintas VHS, las más antiguas que pude encontrar y las reprodujo una y otra y otra vez. Y ella se convirtió, más o menos, en mí. Recuerdo haber escuchado una entrevista en la radio en el carro, y me estaban entrevistando y luego Claire Danes hablaba en la película y casi nos confundí. Keith: ¿Cómo fue verse a si mismo en otro cuerpo? Temple: Bueno, recuerdo haber ido a la, tenían una función privada en la oficina de HBO y yo estaba ahí con los productores de HBO en un pequeño cine que tenían, viéndola. Y fue como entrar en una extraña máquina del tiempo de los años 60 y 70. Eso es lo que se sentía. Keith: ¿Y qué tan preciso fue la película, más allá de retratar su pensamiento visual? Temple: Bueno, tuvimos que cambiar unas cosas para que encajaran en una película de tan solo dos horas, pero me gustó mucho el hecho de que, ya sabes, mis personajes principales, mi madre y el rancho, se veían muy lindos. Y el Sr. Carlock obtuvo un doctorado honorario. Era Sr. Carlock, y lo hicieron Dr. Carlock. Y digo sí, sí lo dejaremos tener un doctorado honorario. Se lo merece. Keith: ¿Por qué cree que las personas neurotípicas creen que las personas con autismo son genios o sabios y carecen de empatía? ¿Por qué esas suposiciones han persistido durante años y años? Temple: Bueno, ahora me hiciste demasiadas preguntas y perdí el hilo de mis pensamientos. Aquí es donde no me va bien con el pensamiento verbal largo. Sobre la empatía, tengo mucha empatía hacia las dificultades físicas. Cuando veo casas destrozadas y la gente mirando eso, digo, ay, eso es simplemente horrible. Recuerdo haber visto edificios de apartamentos destrozados con personas de pie en los apartamentos derruidos. Siento mucha empatía por eso. Y se me olvidó la otra pregunta. Verás, aquí es donde casi no tengo memoria funcional. Keith: Perdón, lo siento. Decía, ¿por qué cree que las personas neurotípicas asumen que las personas con autismo son sabios? Templo: Ah, ya está. La mayoría de los autistas no son sabios. Quiero dejar eso muy claro. Y yo no soy una sabia. Y hay una cantidad de personas autistas que son extremadamente inteligentes, pero eso sin duda no refleja todo el espectro. La otra cosa de la que quiero hablar es que hay individuos que no hablan. Y algunas de estas personas que no hablan pueden aprender a escribir de forma completamente independiente y ellos describen una confusión sensorial. Describen problemas, serían capaces de controlar sus movimientos y necesitamos estar enseñándoles a escribir. Ahora, uno de los grandes problemas con las personas, recuerda que hablé sobre la memoria funcional donde no puedo recordar largas cadenas de instrucciones verbales. Necesito tener una lista de verificación. Cualquier tarea que tenga pasos, necesita una lista de verificación. Entonces, a la persona que estoy enseñando a escribir, no va a funcionar en este escritorio en el que estoy ahora porque mira, el teclado, está mucho más abajo que la foto. Pero la letra, cuando escriba, aparecerá aquí arriba. Las personas autistas no pueden cambiar esa atención. Por eso tienes que usar algo como un iPad porque la letra aparece junto al teclado virtual, o vas a tener que poner una caja aquí con un teclado, para que la letra aparezca justo al lado del teclado. Ese es uno de los secretos para ayudarlos a aprender a escribir. Y conocí a una maestra, creo que se llamaba Mary Crossley, no estoy segura, que hizo esto hace como 30 años, o con una caja. Y hay algunos buenos libros escritos por personas que escriben de forma independiente, como Tito Mukhopadhyay, ¿How Can I Talk If My Lips Don’t Move? Hay un chico japonés, The Reason I Jump, también es una continuación de libro. Creo que The Reason I Jump es un libro mucho mejor, con mucha más información y recomendaría una secuela. Creo que la gente que trabaja con personas que no hablan deben leer estos libros. Ahora, no estoy hablando de niños de tres años, hablo de niños mayores y adultos. Keith: Entonces, ¿hay alguna diferencia entre los sabios y los genios normales, las personas que son súper inteligentes? ¿Hay alguna diferencia y cuáles son esas diferencias? Temple: Bueno, hay algunas personas con autismo que son extremadamente inteligentes. Sí. Y hay, verás, todo un rango, pero hay una pequeña cantidad de ellos que son sabios, ya sabes, como Rainman. Y luego hay otros que tienen un extremo, soy una pensadora visual extrema, lo que me hace muy buena en cosas como comprender a los animales, la fotografía y las cosas mecánicas. Y luego hay algunos que son matemáticos extremos, pero no son sabios. He estado en las empresas de tecnología, ya sabes, que fabrican computadoras y otras cosas y, ay, hay muchas personas con autismo no diagnosticadas en esas empresas de tecnología. Keith: Sí, usted habla mucho sobre Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Alan Turning, padre de la informática moderna, Einstein, Edison, creo, titanes de sus industrias y personas que han remodelado o moldeado la forma en que vivimos y manejamos nuestras vidas. Sabiendo eso, ¿qué esperaría que las personas neurotípicas supieran sobre las personas con autismo? Templo: Bueno, hay algunas cosas que hablé sobre algunas de las cosas para el trabajo, problemas de memoria funcional, necesidad de listas de verificación escritas, evitar trabajos de multitarea. Pero hablo mucho con los líderes empresariales y les digo que necesitan las habilidades. Necesitas las habilidades. Su mejor mecánico de ascensores, su mejor mecánico de aviones no va a tener una buena entrevista. Es probable que sea socialmente torpe. Trabajé con muchas de estas personas. Es posible que su mejor personal informático no entreviste bien. Por eso, creo que es muy importante para una persona autista poder mostrar su portafolio y esa es la razón por la que vendí trabajos mostrando mis dibujos a la gente y, en otras palabras, vendiendo mi trabajo. Les dejo muy claro a los líderes empresariales que necesitan estas habilidades. Lo veo de esta manera, un cerebro puede ser más social, emocional o un cerebro puede ser más pensativo y cognitivo en lo que hace. Entonces, si tuviera que tomar a toda la población del mundo, la mitad de la población probablemente se movería hacia lo socioemocional y la otra mitad se inclinaría un poco más hacia el pensamiento y la lógica interesante. Y, ya sabes, las formas más leves de autismo probablemente sean solo una variante de la personalidad. Ya sabes, ¿desde cuándo ser un poco nerd y geek necesita una etiqueta? No hay una línea divisoria de blanco y negro. No es como tener tuberculosis donde tienes tuberculosis o no tienes tuberculosis y te pueden hacer una prueba de laboratorio. Es un verdadero rasgo continuo. Y yo soy básicamente, soy lo que hago. Y quiero ver a estos niños que son diferentes hoy, levantarse y tener una buena carrera porque eso es lo que me da una vida satisfactoria, es tener una carrera interesante y donde realmente podría mejorar las cosas. Creo que ayudé a mejorar la forma en que se trata al ganado y a otros animales. Keith: ¿Qué pensaría si las personas con autismo se convirtieran en intérpretes de ASL? ¿Es ese un trabajo en el que se destacarían? Templo: Bueno, sí. Te refieres a ser un intérprete sordo, por ejemplo. Keith: Sí. Templo: Va. Bueno, eso sería un gran trabajo para ellos. Y van a ser juzgados por su trabajo. Porque algunos son probablemente mejores que otros. Sí, ese sería un gran trabajo para alguien en el espectro autista, no sería un gran trabajo para mí. Pero podría ser un gran trabajo para otra persona. Keith: Sí. ¿Hay una diferencia entre ser intérprete de ASL, lenguaje de señas americano e intérprete para personas sordas? Temple: Sí. Una cosa en la que creo es que necesitamos llevar a los niños y adultos jóvenes y exponerlos a muchas cosas diferentes. Me preguntan todo el tiempo, ¿cómo acabé en la industria ganadera? Acabé aquí porque estuve expuesta cuando era adolescente. No crecí en esto. Demasiados niños hoy, han quitado las clases prácticas. No usan herramientas, no saben medir cosas. Sabes, necesitamos volver a dar todas esas clases prácticas. Algunas escuelas lo están haciendo ahora porque solo puedes interesarte en algo a lo que estás expuesto. No estás expuesto a algo, ¿cómo es posible que te interese? También sugiero a los padres, si un niño tiene una obsesión con los carros, entonces leamos sobre los carros. Hagamos matemáticas con los carros. Aprendamos cómo funcionan. Vamos a leer sobre la historia de los carros. ¿Ves cómo estoy tomando este interés en los carros y lo estoy ampliando? Los padres y los maestros no quieren acabar con los intereses. Lo que quiero hacer es ampliarlos y hacerlos menos obsesionados. Cuando era pequeña, hacía dibujos constantes de una sola cabeza de caballo y mi madre me sugirió, bueno, dibujamos todo el caballo. Dibujemos la silla de montar. Ella tomó mi interés por el dibujo y lo amplió. Keith: Entonces, ¿cómo fue ir a la escuela en la generación anterior a la ADA? Temple: Bueno, tuve mucha suerte de que hubiera una pequeña escuela local a la que asistí donde mi madre y la maestra acababan de empezar a salir. Y luego, siendo un poco mayor, me botaron de una secundaria normal y eso fue un desastre. Y ahí es donde mi familia sí tenía dinero para mandarme a una escuela especial. Porque una escuela normal simplemente no funcionaba. Y cuando fui a la escuela especial, me pusieron a trabajar limpiando establos de caballos. Querían asegurarse de que aprendiera a trabajar, lo cual era súper importante. Ahora hay muchos abuelos de mi generación que son autistas y he hablado con ellos en las reuniones. Y una de las cosas que les ayudó, al tipo Asperger donde no hay retraso en el habla, es que tenían rutas de papel a los 11 años, aprendieron a trabajar. También en los años 50, modales en la mesa, darse la mano, aprender a tomar turnos en la conversación, eso se enseñaba. En realidad, eso se enseñaba en los años 50 a todos los niños. Yo tenía un caso muy severo a los tres años, así que era el tipo de niña a la que normalmente ingresaban en una institución, pero más del tipo Asperger donde no hay retraso en el habla, muchos de ellos tenían problemas con las relaciones. Pero he hablado con muchísimos de ellos que tenían trabajos decentes. Así que, la gente de mi edad, tal vez, ya sabes, diez años más joven, y ahí es donde más se enseñan las habilidades sociales, como nos sentábamos en la cena y me estiraba sobre la mesa para tomar el plato de puré de papas y mi madre decía, pídele a tu hermana que te lo pase. Ella me daría las instrucciones. De hecho, a los niños se les enseñó esto y creo que eso ayudó a algunos de esos abuelos y abuelas a conseguir esos trabajos. Keith: Entonces, volviendo a sus memorias, el capítulo siete de Thinking In Pictures, se llama "Dating Data", y me encanta cómo usa la analogía de los datos en Star Trek, la próxima generación. ¿Qué piensa sobre las relaciones y las personas con autismo en general? Temple: Aunque creo que las relaciones suelen funcionar mejor cuando hay una amistad a través de intereses compartidos. Como cuando yo estaba en la secundaria, uno de los lugares donde no me intimidaban era cuando montaba a caballo. Ese era un lugar donde no me acosaban. Y necesitamos estar trabajando en amigos que comparten nuestros intereses. Un maestro emprendedor comenzó un club de Star Wars para un niño de primaria que estaba siendo acosado, otros niños se unieron, eso es algo fácil de hacer y ni siquiera costó nada. Ese tipo de cosas son fáciles de hacer, para ayudar a conseguir amigos que comparten intereses. Además, tuve que aprender que no podía seguir y seguir hablando de mi cosa favorita, una y otra y otra y otra vez, hasta el punto en que todos los demás se aburrieran. Keith: Si hay defensores aspirantes que recién están comenzando su camino de defensa como lo hizo usted, tiene experiencia, una gran experiencia, ¿cuáles serían sus cinco sugerencias para los defensores de la próxima generación? Temple: Bueno, lo primero, no hice ninguna defensa del autismo hasta un poco después de mis 20 años. Estaba trabajando en los patios de alimentación, diseñando equipos y siendo una mujer en los años 70 que ingresaba a la industria ganadera era una barrera mucho más grande que el autismo. Una barrera mucho, mucho más grande. Y la mayoría de mis problemas eran con la administración intermedia. Estaba escribiendo como editora de la sección de ganado para nuestra revista State Farm, y era, y tenía todo esto, ya sabes, todo este trabajo que estaba haciendo. Entonces comenzó la promoción y la defensa. Y le he dicho a muchas personas que creo que podrían ser defensores más efectivos si, junto con la defensa, tuvieran un trabajo que no tuviera nada que ver con eso. Quiero decir, estoy escribiendo para la revista. Fue uno de mis primeros trabajos. No tenía nada que ver con el autismo. Tenía que hacerlo, había ciertas reuniones que tenía que cubrir. Arizona Cattle Feeders, Arizona Cattle Growers, Arizona National Stock Show. Esas cosas que tenía que cubrir todos los años. Luego hacía algunos reportajes, y esto no tenía nada que ver con el autismo y gané respeto porque era buena escribiendo artículos. Y cuando cubrí la reunión de alimentadores de perreras, resumí esos discursos con precisión y gané, ya sabes, respeto por eso. Así que comencé con el trabajo y el mayor problema que veo ahora, especialmente, ya sabes, los adolescentes totalmente verbales, es que no están haciendo la transición al trabajo. Y luego puedo pensar en las veces que estuve en las plantas y estuve trabajando con personas que eran definitivamente autistas, que tenían talleres de metal y equipos patentados. Ahora creo que uno de los lugares donde creo que mucha gente hoy necesitará ayuda para iniciar su propio negocio, es mucho más complicado hoy en día. Esto es algo en lo que podría establecer un servicio de contabilidad que las personas que tienen negocios independientes lo podrían usar a un precio razonable, porque ahí es donde muchas personas con autismo necesitan ayuda, establecer un negocio y administrar una parte comercial de un negocio. Keith: Entonces, ¿quiere o recomienda que las personas, los defensores, comiencen simplemente haciendo un trabajo no relacionado con la defensa? Templo: Bueno, no. Lo que digo es que ellos podrían hacer el trabajo primero. Hice el trabajo primero, o al menos, hice el trabajo junto con la promoción y defensa. Porque creo que serán mejores defensores si pueden hablar, bueno, así es como conseguí este trabajo. Así es como mantengo este trabajo. Creo que eso los ayudará a ser mejores defensores. Quiero decir, podrían hacer las dos cosas al mismo tiempo. Probablemente tenía 10 años de trabajo en ese entonces, la defensa comenzó una pequeña reunión a la vez con una señora llamada Warner Jean King, que estaba haciendo terapia ocupacional con integración sensorial con niños autistas, ya sabes, en los años 70. Y hablo con algunos de sus grupos. Y luego me invitaron a dar algunas charlas a principios de los 80 con un grupo de educación continua y luego se me acercó una pequeña prensa que hizo mi primer libro Emergence Labeled Autistic. Keith: Entonces, ¿qué espera que los oyentes con discapacidades consigan al escuchar este episodio? Temple: Lo siento, no entendí esa pregunta. Keith: Perdón. ¿Qué espera que los oyentes con discapacidades se lleven de este episodio? Temple: Bueno, creo que debemos, ya sabes, salir y hacer cosas. Y sé que una de las cosas, es un problema, he hablado con muchas personas al respecto, es que si reciben pagos por su discapacidad, trabajan demasiado y luego pierden su seguro médico. Y creo que ese es un gran problema porque dará motivos de no trabajar porque no se pueden dar el lujo de perder su seguro médico. Ahora es diferente en diferentes estados y algunos estados son súper malos. No voy a nombrar ningún estado y algunos estados son mucho mejores en términos de la cantidad de dinero que una persona con, ya sabes, que tiene el seguro social, tal vez puedo dar, poner los nombres incorrectos para algunas de estas cosas, el pago. Pero recuerdo haber hablado con un hombre y dijo, “es una especie de trampa”. Esas son sus palabras, no las mías. Y lo que creo que deben hacer es, pase lo que pase, mantener el seguro médico. Tenía un compañero de cuarto ciego cuando estaba en la escuela de posgrado, y Gloria y yo estábamos discutiendo esto y ella dijo, podría renunciar al pago de seguro social si pudiera mantener el seguro médico. Eso fue en los años 70. Y todavía lo estoy escuchando hoy. Es un problema real. Algunos estados te permitirán ganar bastante dinero. Y hay otros estados, solo estuve en uno de ellos, en donde no puedes ganar nada. Y pierdes el seguro de salud. Creo que eso es algo en lo que los defensores deben trabajar para cambiarlo. Creo que es terrible. Keith: Entonces, ¿qué espera que los oyentes que aún no se han vuelto neurodiversos se lleven de este episodio? Temple: Bueno, hay todo tipo de discapacidades y necesitan diferentes tipos de ayuda. Y lo que creo que debemos tener es el énfasis en lo que la gente puede hacer. Tengo otro libro llamado Navegating Austism, lo escribí con Debra Moore, y ella habla sobre las etiquetas donde los padres y maestros se enfocan tanto en la etiqueta que creen que la persona no puede hacer nada. Ya sabes, digamos que alguien está usando una silla de ruedas, entonces pueden asumir que no puede hacer nada. Bueno, puede hacer muchas cosas. La programación de computadoras es una de ellas. Si tuviera una mentalidad matemática, podría hacer eso, eso podría ser algo que podría hacer y lo haría muy bien. Yo tengo un servicio de contestador telefónico a la antigua. Sé que hace unos 20 años cuando se rompió el teléfono, los llamé y el dueño dijo, “no puedo pasar los cables” y ahí fue cuando me di cuenta de que estaba en una silla de ruedas. Dirigía ese negocio de servicio de contestador. Solo lo supe porque me dijo que no podía pasar por encima de un cable. Y era dueño de un negocio. Verá, este es el tipo de cosas que soy, hablé con otro chico que era un fotógrafo hermoso, absolutamente hermoso en una silla de ruedas, y tenía una de estas sillas eléctricas asistidas que funciona como una silla manual, pero es una asistencia eléctrica. Y le digo, deberías ir a exhibiciones de flores y tomar fotos de flores. Todo lo que tienes que hacer es mostrar tu portafolio. Ya estás contratado. Centro de convenciones accesible según la ADA, eso sería genial. Ay, esas fotos de flores eran tan hermosas. Ese es el trabajo. Y la gente pagará un montón de dinero por eso. Keith: Entonces, volviendo a la película, particularmente al final donde me emocioné mucho, en primer lugar, compartimos tres cosas. Mi voz no llegó hasta los siete años. Mi primer idioma fue una versión de ASL. Ambos no pasamos álgebra en la secundaria. La tomé tres veces. Temple: Bueno, no pude, no sé si podría graduarme de la secundaria hoy porque no puedo hacer álgebra. Y, afortunadamente, las matemáticas universitarias no trataban de álgebra, pero yo no puedo hacer álgebra. Y pienso en algunas de estas cosas que necesitan retroceder, he hablado con estudiantes que quieren convertirse en veterinarios. Es un título universitario de dos años. Están en su segunda y tercera clase de álgebra y no necesitas álgebra para ser una veterinaria. Ahora, creo que una de las razones por las que se promueve el álgebra es que más mentes matemáticas piensan que se necesita el álgebra para el pensamiento lógico. Y me horroricé cuando estaba firmando libros para Visual Thinking. El año pasado dimos una de las charlas en una escuela y me senté con el director durante una hora y él no sabía cuál era mi forma de pensar. No sabía que existía. Y pensé, te gustaría que el aire acondicionado funcionara en este edificio, ¿no? Sí. Hace calor en el verano. Vas a necesitar gente como yo que no sepa álgebra. Pero suelo pensar en qué pasaría si agitara una varita mágica y ahora tuviera 18 años. Recién reprobé el bachillerato, no pude graduarme por el álgebra, pero me dejaron conservar mis conocimientos. ¿Que debería hacer? Entraría por la puerta trasera de un negocio y sabría exactamente cómo hacerlo. Vi gente en la industria de la carne conseguir un trabajo en la línea de producción. 15 años después, eran gerentes de proyecto para la nueva edición más fresca. Y me dirigiría al almacén de Amazon o, si pudiera, a la nueva fábrica de chips que están construyendo porque tengo un objetivo. Voy a diseñar el siguiente. Y esa carrera profesional es completamente posible. He visto a gente hacerlo y sé cómo funcionan las grandes corporaciones. Sólo voy derecho a la puerta de atrás. Y mucha gente no se da cuenta de que existe la puerta trasera, pero la mitad de todos los buenos trabajos son por puertas traseras. Keith: Entonces, al final de la película, cuando llevó a su compañero de cuarto a ver lo que hizo al final. Dijo que no sé qué vendrá después, lo que significa que no sé qué hay al otro lado de esta vida, pero quiero dejar un legado atrás, sentir que hice una diferencia. Temple: Bueno, me gustaría hacer algo como una diferencia positiva. Tenemos demasiadas personas hoy que salen y hacen algo muy malo que está marcando una diferencia negativa. Keith: Entonces mi pregunta es, ¿siente que ha hecho eso a lo largo de su vida? Temple: Bueno, mi mente no piensa, los pensadores verbales, como los pensadores verbales regulares, tienden a ser muy de arriba hacia abajo. Hablarán sobre adaptaciones o ya sabes, un salón de clases inclusivo o lo que sea. Y es muy, muy vago. Sabes, creo en detalles, justo el otro día estaba caminando hacia el estacionamiento y me encontré con una estudiante que estaba en el espectro autista. Alegré su día. Pues, creo que hice una diferencia en su vida. Creo que la ayudé a inspirarse y nos tomamos una foto en el estacionamiento. Ese fue un buen viaje al estacionamiento y ya sabes, este es el tipo de cosas ahora. Ya pasó el tiempo de jubilación y quiero ayudar a la próxima generación, mostrarles que pueden hacerlo. Una de las cosas que me motivó en los años 70 cuando estaba trabajando en los proyectos que se mostraban en la película, y esos son exactos, quería demostrar que no era estúpida. Esa fue una motivación muy, muy grande para mí. Mucha gente pensó que era estúpida y que no valdría nada. Keith: ¿Y en qué está trabajando actualmente? Temple: Bueno, todavía estoy dando mi clase y manejo ganado. Estoy haciendo muchos compromisos para hablar, muchas reuniones de Zoom. También estoy, ya sabes, escribiendo artículos sobre temas de ganadería. Así que voy a trabajar en escribir un artículo sobre cómo desarrollo algunos sistemas de evaluación del bienestar animal que esperamos que lean los estudiantes. Hay cosas muy prácticas. Con demasiada frecuencia tenemos demasiada teoría y no suficiente práctica. Volvamos a los alojamientos. Va. Ya hablamos de la lista de verificación del piloto. Hablemos de evitar la multitarea rápida, pero algunas otras adaptaciones podrían ser descansos sensoriales. Otra adaptación en el trabajo podría ser la iluminación LED que parpadea, y eso puede ser un problema para un segmento de personas autistas. Entonces, ¿cómo lidias con eso si no puedes deshacerte de él? Compra una lámpara, ponle una bombilla. Probablemente sea una LED, pero encuentra una que no parpadee y colócala al lado de tu escritorio. Unas muy brillante. Y si puedes cambiar las luces, genial. Pero si no puedes, debes anular esas luces con una luz más brillante que no parpadee. Verás, me gusta compartir con la gente este tipo de cosas prácticas. Hay auriculares con cancelación de ruido, pero el problema es que si los usa todo el tiempo, su sensibilidad al sonido empeorará. Lo que quieres hacer es tenerlos contigo todo el tiempo. Traté de no usarlos todo el tiempo, pero llévatelos contigo. Eso te da el control. Y si está trabajando con niños, deje que los niños enciendan la aspiradora o el secador de pelo, algo que no les guste el sonido, porque cuando controlan ese sonido, pueden tolerarlo mejor cuando lo enciendan o apaguen. Por lo general, estos son el tipo de consejos que me gusta compartir. Hay algunas personas cuando van a leer, ven que la letra se mueve en la página porque es el problema con los circuitos en la parte posterior del cerebro que forman los archivos gráficos. Aquí hay algo sencillo que a veces funciona. Intenté imprimir la tarea en papel pastel claro, como, por ejemplo, en mi libro para niños, Calling All Minds, puede ver que hay un papel azul claro en ese papel pastel como ese azul claro, marrón claro, gris claro. Prueba estos diferentes papeles pastel, ponlos en una fotocopiadora. Esto funciona para algunas personas. Me gusta compartir estas cosas muy sencillas. Me gusta el papel de color pastel. Ya sabes, lo que hay que hacer con las luces LED, la lista de verificación de los pilotos, cosas que podrían hacer, cosas simples que puedes hacer que pueden hacer una gran diferencia. Keith: Acaba de mencionar que uno de los grandes motivadores de su vida fue demostrarles a los demás que no era estúpida y lo ha logrado. Se ha vuelto mundialmente famosa. ¿Cómo se siente acerca de lo que ha hecho con su vida? Temple: Pues, en este momento me preguntan cómo me siento acerca de las personas que vienen y me reconocen en el aeropuerto y cosas así. Y siento que es una responsabilidad. Siempre tengo que comportarme bien, y espero poder inspirar a los jóvenes a levantarse y hacer cosas, porque descubrí que algunas de las cosas más interesantes y divertidas que hice fue sentarme con otras personas y descubrir cómo construir cosas. Me causaban mucho estrés esos trabajos porque teníamos que fabricar equipos que funcionaran, pero solo descifrar cómo construir cosas. Esos son amigos que comparten intereses y sí, estoy haciendo promoción y defensa. Pero, justo ayer salí a un patio de alimentación. Vi un ganado muy bueno ahí y me senté en el comedero y dejaré que las vacas me laman. Ay. Esa fue una tarde linda. La disfruté. Keith: Así que mencionó en la parte superior de la entrevista que su madre y su tía tuvieron un papel muy importante en su vida, en su educación. Si pudieran verle ahora o si pudiera decirles algo, ¿qué sería? Temple: Bueno, mi madre siempre fue, tenía un buen sentido de cómo empujarme a hacer las cosas. Ella siempre me daría opciones. Y estábamos limitados en cuanto a la cantidad de televisión que podíamos ver. Ya sabes, querían que saliéramos y jugáramos. Y no puedo enfatizar lo suficiente, ya sabes, la importancia de los maestros y mentores. Simplemente no puedo enfatizar lo suficiente importante que es eso. Sólo quiero advertirles que nos vamos a topar con una parada, en unos diez minutos. Keith: Sí. Gracias. Bueno, me gustó mucho la entrevista. Disfruté conocerla, y espero que se mantenga en contacto y que pueda entrevistarla nuevamente. Temple: Sí, podríamos hacer eso. Podríamos hacer eso de nuevo. Y me gustó mucho lo que dijo Stephen Hawking sobre la discapacidad, y estoy segura de que todos saben que Stephen Hawking es un físico famoso y le dijo al New York Times poco antes de morir, “concéntrate en esas cosas que tu discapacidad no te impide hacer bien”. Él podía hacer matemáticas mentalmente muy bien y no mucho más, pero hacía matemáticas. Hizo lo que su discapacidad no le impedía hacer. Me gustó mucho cuando descubrí que Stephen Hawkings había dicho eso. Keith: Bueno, Temple, muchas gracias por su tiempo y autenticidad, disfruté su trabajo y espero ver lo que hace a continuación. Temple: Bueno, voy a seguir haciendo lo que estoy haciendo. Pon mi libro aquí, Visual Thinking. Si quieres descubrir cómo piensas y cuáles podrían ser buenos trabajos para ti, puedes leer este libro. También hablamos sobre Thinking In Pictures, mis memorias de hace 26 años, como discutimos anteriormente. Lo diré ahora porque los intérpretes no estaban aquí. Hablé de mis experiencias con el medicamento y tuve algunas experiencias muy favorables que se describen en detalle en este libro. Y solo quiero asegurarme de que se incluyó la parte de la entrevista en la que tuviste a los intérpretes. Keith: Gracias de nuevo. Cuídese amiga. Temple: Lo haré, me despido y muchas, muchas gracias por recibirme. Keith: Gracias. Va, adiós. Templo: Adiós. Keith: Has estado escuchando Disability Empowerment Now. Me gustaría agradecer a mi invitada, a ti, a nuestro oyente y al Equipo de empoderamiento de las personas con discapacidades que hicieron posible este episodio. Puedes encontrar más información sobre el podcast en DisabilityEmpowermentNow.com o en las redes sociales @disabilityempowermentnow. El podcast está disponible dondequiera que escuche podcasts o en el sitio web oficial. ¡No olvides calificar, comentar y compartir el podcast! Este episodio de Disability Empowerment Now tiene derechos de autor 2023.

Other Episodes

Episode 0

June 11, 2022 01:01:08
Episode Cover

Episode 4 with Kat Stratford

Kat Stratford is a single mom to a brilliant daughter and an extraordinary trans son. A twenty-year resident of Tucson, Kat is an outspoken...

Listen

Episode 0

January 22, 2023 01:24:30
Episode Cover

S2 Episode 10 with Jackie Schuld

 Jackie Schuld is an autistic art therapist specializing in newly identified autistics and those who suspect they might be autistic. She is also an...

Listen

Episode 0

August 28, 2023 00:02:12
Episode Cover

Season 3 Trailer

Season 3 trailer is here! This season, host Keith Murfee DeConcini explores the theme of disability and entertainment with guests like Temple Grandin, Ron...

Listen